Tag Archives: The Civil War in Georgia

Parrish-Billue House, 1810, Clinton

This home was built for one of Jones County’s earliest settlers, Captain John Parrish, who also served as an early county commissioner. During the the March to the Sea, the residence was briefly occupied by Union General Kirkpatrick as a temporary headquarters. The smaller structure attached to the right side of the house was built in 1821 and in 1830 served as the law office of Alfred Iverson, Sr., and Samuel Lowther. Iverson went on to serve in the Georgia legislature, the House of Representatives, and the United States Senate. His son, Alfred Iverson, Jr., served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Western and Atlantic Railroad Depot, 1854, Cartersville

One of just a handful of surviving Western and Atlantic Railroad depots, the Cartersville depot now serves as the town’s Welcome Center. That it has survived at all is a bit of a miracle, considering it was in the direct path of Sherman’s forces as they headed into Atlanta. On 20 May 1864, Confederate forces occupied the depot in an effort to protect it, knocking out sections of the wall for use as gun ports. Due to other concerns, Sherman, let the depot stand, but there were light skirmishes between the Confederate and Union forces at the site. About six months later, when Sherman returned to Cartersville, a Union soldier cut the telegraph line from the depot, isolating Cartersville from the outside world, and the March to the Sea was underway.

Cartersville Downtown Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Cartersville GA

LaGrange Presbyterian Church, 1844

The oldest non-residential structure in LaGrange, this Greek Revival church was built by Benjamin H. Cameron for the local Presbyterian congregation in 1844. It served as a Confederate hospital from 1863-1865. The Reverend Dr. James Woodrow, uncle of Woodrow Wilson, was tried here by the Presbyterian Synod for teaching evolution in 1885. It later featured a steeple built by George and John King, sons of the great bridge builder, Horace King, but it was removed when the congregation relocated in 1919. The structure has subsequently served as a public library, funeral home, athletic club, and as home to another congregation.

 

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, LaGrange GA

Lewis-Cary House, Circa 1850, LaGrange

This classic Italianate cottage was built for Nicholas Lewis. During the Civil War, it was occupied by refugees from various Southern states. A prominent local physician, Dr. Henry Hamilton Cary, purchased the home in 1869.

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, LaGrange GA

Cowles-Bond-Woodruff House, 1836-1840, Macon

Elam Alexander began construction on this house on Coleman Hill in 1836, for Jerry Cowles, the financier who brought the railroad from Knoxville, Tennessee, to Macon and who served as president of the Ocmulgee Bank. The house took on its present monumental appearance with the addition of the colonnade in 1840. Financial woes led Cowles to New York during the 1840s and the house was purchased by Joseph Bond, one of Georgia’s most prominent cotton growers. Bond’s time in the house was short, however, as he was killed by a neighboring plantation owner in a dispute over slave.

In 1865, the estate served as the headquarters of Union Brigadier General James H. Wilson during his occupation of the city. In 1879, James T. Coleman purchased the property and the surrounding area became known as Coleman Hill.

The Oriental/Moorish gazebo, built during the Victorian era, is one of Macon’s most popular photo subjects.

Beginning in 1960, the house served as the segregationist Stratford Academy for a time [now an inclusive institution located elsewhere] and was later gifted to Mercer University by the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation. It remains one of Macon’s most enduring landmarks.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Chapman-Lamar-Green House, Circa 1840, Macon

Ambrose Chapman built this transitional Federal Style house circa 1840 and less than three weeks after its completion, sold it to U. S. congressman Henry G. Lamar. In 1846, Lamar sold the house to Judge Abner Powers who owned it until 1858, when it was purchased by Dr. James Mercer Green (1815-1881), Dr. Green, who served as Surgeon at various appointments in the Confederate States, was also responsible for overseeing the care of scores of wounded Confederate soldiers at locations around Macon during the Civil War.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

[Publisher’s Note]: We are introducing the tag Vanishing Middle Georgia with this post, to recognize the strong sense of regional identity embraced by Middle Georgians.

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Iron Springs Clubhouse, Butts County

This served for many years as the gathering place for the people of the Iron Springs community. The area is rich in history, as a historical marker placed by the Georgia Historical Commission in 1957 notes: On the night of Nov. 17, 1864, the Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps) of General Sherman’s army, which had marched south from Atlanta on Nov 15th on its destructive March to the sea, reached Jackson and camped in and around the town, Hq. Right Wing. Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, USA, and the headquarters of both corps were established in Jackson. Elements of the 17th Corps (Blair) moved forward to iron springs and camped here on the road to Planter’s Factory (Ocmulgee Mills) at Seven Islands (5 miles SE), the point which had been selected for the passage of the Right Wing, camped near Worthville (7 miles NW). That night the 29th Missouri Mounted Infantry seized the ferry at Seven Islands and secured both banks of the river for the passage. Next morning, the 1st Missouri Engineers passed through Iron Springs with the pontoons and, by 1:00 P.M., two bridges were ready and crossing operations had begun. Late that night, the 17th Corps having cleared Iron Springs, the Artillery Brigade arrived and went into camp. Although both bridges were in use day and night, heavy rains had made the roads so difficult that the passage was not completed until the afternoon of the 20th.

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Filed under --BUTTS COUNTY GA--

Mills House, Circa 1855, Griffin

Also known as the Lewis-Mills House, this grand Greek Revival was built for the Lewis family, who came to the South from Massachusetts. Mrs. Emily W. Lewis was living in the house with her granddaughter, Lavonia Hammond, during the Civil War. Lavonia recalled that the house served as a hospital for Confederate soldiers and hosted Alexander H. Stephens, Robert Toombs, and Benjamin Harvey Hill, all good friends of her father. In 1878, Lavonia married John B. Mills and they resided in the house with Lavonia’s grandmother. When Mrs. Lewis died in 1901, John Mills purchased the house from his wife’s siblings. When Lavonia Hammond Mills died in 1936, the house passed out of the family’s hands. It had numerous owners in subsequent years and was eventually subdivided into apartments. After falling into disrepair it was restored and is now the office of a law firm.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --SPALDING COUNTY GA--, Griffin GA

Civil War Memorials, Palmetto

The marker placed by the Georgia Historical Commission in 1956 notes: The Army of Tennessee [Confederate] abandoned Atlanta Sept. 2, 1864, moved to Lovejoy, then to Palmetto, Sept. 19. Most of the Army entrenched 3 miles N. Gen. John B. Hood had headquarters here from Sept. 19 to 29, 1864. Pres. Jefferson Davis visited here Sept. 25th and on the 26th made a speech to the troops 3 miles N. where he was serenaded by the 20th Louisiana Ban. That same night Gen. Howell Cobb and Gov. Isham Harris of Tenn. spoke. On the 27th Pres. Davis left for Montgomery. Gen. Hardee was relieved of his command here, Sept. 28, and on the 29th Gen. Hood moved from here to start the disastrous Tennessee Campaign.

The obelisk was placed by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1906 to honor Company C, 19th Georgia Infantry and Company I, 2nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteers, Wheeler’s Cavalry.

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Filed under --FULTON COUNTY GA--, Palmetto GA

Cobb-Bucknell-Leathers House, Circa 1849, Athens

One of the most prominent politicians of 19th-century Georgia, Howell Cobb (1815-1868) lived here while Governor of Georgia, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives, Secretary of the Treasury, and Confederate General. It was here that the Articles of Confederation were read to a crowd of onlookers in 1861 and where federal troops arrested Cobb.

Cobbham Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --CLARKE COUNTY GA--, Athens GA