Tag Archives: Stone Structures

Central of Georgia Railway Depot, 1890, Chickamauga

After having fallen into disrepair for many years, including the loss of its tower, this depot was recently restored and is now home to the Walker County Regional Heritage and Train Museum.

Chickamauga Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WALKER COUNTY GA--, Chickamauga GA

Tudor Revival House, Buchanan

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Filed under --HARALSON COUNTY GA--, Buchanan GA

Stone-Sided Law Office, Clayton

clayton-ga-rock-house-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-north-georgia-usa-2016

This is an attorney’s office. I don’t know if it was built recently for this purpose or if it was originally a house. Stone structures like this are emblematic of the mountains to me.

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Filed under --RABUN COUNTY GA--, Clayton GA

The Rock House, 1785, McDuffie County

Rock House Thomas Ansley Wrightsboro Quaker Settlement McDuffie County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2016

Also known as the Old Rock House, this treasure, built by Thomas Ansley (1737-1809) in the Quaker-settled Wrightsboro(ugh) Township, is the oldest stone house in Georgia and among the oldest well-documented structures in the state. Ansley was a native of Freehold, New Jersey, where stone houses were common and the abundance of material in this area near the Fall Line was certainly a factor. Ansley settled in Georgia in 1768 after a few years in North Carolina. He and his wife Rebecca Cox were part of a colony of 40 Quaker families who came to Georgia seeking religious tolerance. Though he didn’t bear arms in the American Revolution, Ansley served as a forager and drover for the Army.

Rock House Thomas Ansley Wrightsboro Quakers McDuffie County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2016

When Ansley died in 1809 he left an estate with four houses and eight slaves. A thriving livestock operation also remained. Ansley was an ancestor of President Jimmy Carter, whose Revolutionary War-era novel The Hornet’s Nest takes place around Wrightsboro.

Rock House Thomas Ansley Fieldstone Wrightsboro Quaker Settlement McDuffie County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2016

The house was occupied until 1950. Soon after, vandals ruined much of the interior woodwork and rock walls. This led to the creation of the Wrighstboro Quaker Community Foundation, which from what I can gather from online sources, is still the owner of the property.

Rock House Thomas Ansley Interior Renovation Wrightsboro Quaker Settlement McDuffie County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2016

Part of the joy of this house, to me, was the fact that it feels “right” as to the interior details but not forced, like many house museums. There is a gate around the property with a small opening, but people in the neighborhood keep a very close eye on this landmark. I encountered some while there and told them I was photographing. Online sources like Explore Georgia and McDuffie County Chamber note the address and that it’s a free attraction; however, I feel reassured to know that in such a remote location, there is neighborhood concern and diligence.

Rock House Thomas Ansley Interior Wrightsboro Quaker Settlement McDuffie County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2016

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --McDUFFIE COUNTY GA--

Walasi-Yi Interpretive Center, 1937, Union County

Walasi Yi Center Blood Mountain GA Appalachian Trail Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

Though it’s evolved over the years, the focal point of the center remains the old Walasi-Yi Inn (pronounced Wa La See Yee) built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) between 1934-37 on the site of an old tea room and inn previously owned by the Pfister-Vogel Land Company.

Blood Mountain at Neel Gap Appalachian Trail Walasi Yi Center Union County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

This site on Blood Mountain (elevation 4458) was known as Frogtown Gap until the completion of the highway around 1924, when it was changed to Neel (or Neel’s) Gap to honor the highway engineer. It’s been suggested that Walasi was a great mythical frog in Cherokee lore who was the chief of the animal council and made his home high on this gap. The CCC inn and restaurant operated until the 1960s and the structure fell into disrepair. Slated for demolition in the 1970s, it was saved by locals. The Walasi-Yi Interpretive Center building is also significant as the only place the Appalachian Trail passes through a structure over its 2100+ miles.

Mountain Crossings Walasi Yi Center Blood Mountain GA Bronson Cat Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

These days, you’re likely to be greeted by one of the center’s famous tabby cats, who seem to have no care in the world and don’t mind the hoardes of tourists and hikers passing through. Since 1983, the center has been an outfitter and store known as Mountain Crossings at Neel Gap.

Cell Phone Booth at Mountain Crossings Walasi Yi Center Appalachian Trail Blood Mountain GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

Appalachian Trail stickers and kitsch are evident everywhere here. One of my favorites is the “Cell Phone Booth”, an old pay telephone booth minus the telephone, that was left behind to afford hikers a covered spot to use their cell phones in this often wet locale.

Mountain Crossings Walasi Yi Center Blood Mountain GA AT Appalachian Trail Hiking Stickers Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

Hikers who have done 30 miles on the trail leave their worn out boots and shoes in an old tree at the center. Those who have completed at least 500 miles can hang their shoes and packs inside to inspire other hikers.

Mountain Crossings Appalachian Trail Blood Mountain Walasi YI Shoe Tree Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

https://www.mountaincrossings.com/Articles.asp?ID=1

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Filed under --UNION COUNTY GA--

Georgia Railroad Depot, 1848, Crawforfd

Crawford GA Oglethorpe County Georgia Railway Depot Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

From the December 2010 issue of Preservation Posts (Historic Preservation Division, DNR)

The depot was constructed with granite block, likely including a few granite cross ties that were used along the rail line before the advent of heavy steam engines required their replacement with more flexible wooden cross ties.  Depots constructed entirely from stone are extremely rare in Georgia.  Most depots are constructed from wood or brick with only a few built with the exterior walls entirely constructed from granite block.  The depot, built to serve the Athens branch of the Georgia Railroad, also served the towns of Arnoldsville, Dunlop, Maxeys, Union Point, and Woodville.  The depot also served as a shipment and supply facility for the Confederate Army during the Civil War…”

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --OGLETHORPE COUNTY GA--, Crawford GA

Old Hancock County Jail, 1905, Sparta

Old Hancock County Jail Sparta GA Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

This sturdy old granite structure was recently restored.

Sparta Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--, Sparta GA