Tag Archives: North Georgia Vernacular Architecture

Baptist Church, Meansville

I have heard from a couple of sources that this was the old location of the Meansville Baptist Church. It’s on the edge of town and was apparently last used as a private residence. I would appreciate any corrections or further information.

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Filed under --PIKE COUNTY GA--, Meansville GA

Central Hallway Cottage, Euharlee

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Euharlee GA

Militia District #851 Courthouse, 1890s, Euharlee

Euharlee was a part of Militia District #851, and this historic courthouse was the de facto center of justice in the rural community. It was nicely restored after years of neglect.

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Euharlee GA

Calaboose, 1890s, Euharlee

The calaboose is located adjacent to the district courthouse.

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Euharlee GA

Lowry Farm Dependency, Euharlee

Though identified here as a general store for the purposes of the historical park adjacent to the Euharlee Creek Covered Bridge, this structure was one of the original dependencies of the Lowry Farm, perhaps a smokehouse or storage barn. It dates to the latter half of the 19th century. The window is not original to the structure.

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Euharlee GA

Old Brick Mill, 1830s, Lindale

The Old Brick Mill at Lindale is the only surviving antebellum brick grist mill in Northwest Georgia and one of just a handful of surviving antebellum mills of any construction in Georgia. It was built of bricks made on site by enslaved people. Located on Silver Creek just across the road from the entrance to the Lindale Manufacturing Company, it is a favorite spot for photographers. Though it ceased operation as a grist mill in the late 1890s, it remained an important community landmark, serving as home to a local Garden Club, Boy Scout troop, and Masonic lodge at various times throughout the 20th century. The Lindale paper, The Georgia Free Lance, was also printed here around 1909.

The landmark, believed to have been built for Larkin Barnett in the 1830s, has seen various changes over time, including the loss of the mill race, the original wheel, and steps, but retains much of its structural integrity. Subsequent private owners and operators were William Cabe of Alabama [Silver Creek Mills], Jacob Henry Hoss [millwright], Joseph Fulcher, William Hemphill Jones, and Mary Jane & Sarah Elizabeth Jones. It ceased operation when it was purchased by the Massachusetts Mills. It was restored by the Lindale Garden Club, who won a National Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts, in 1975.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --FLOYD COUNTY GA--, Lindale GA

Cave Entrance, 1930s, Cave Spring

This structure, built of local stone by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s, marks the entrance to the limestone cave which gives the community its name. Two million gallons flow daily from the source, which has been a landmark since long before the establishment of the town in 1832.

In 1931 Dr. J. B. Rolater deeded the cave and 29 adjacent acres to the people of Cave Spring for use as a public park. In the early days local residents were allowed to tour the cave for free, while tourists were charged ten cents.

Rolater Park Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --FLOYD COUNTY GA--, Cave Spring GA

Avery Vann Cabin, 1810, Cave Spring

This hand-hewn cabin was built by Avery Vann, Jr., (1770-1845). Vann, a Scottish trader who married a Cherokee woman, was the brother of Cherokee Chief James Vann and his prominence in the area led to its designation as Vann’s Valley.

For many years, the structure was hidden within the walls of the old Webster-Green Hotel in downtown Cave Spring. When the hotel faced eminent demolition in 2009, the Cave Spring Historical Society led the effort to save the cabin and their work revealed this important aspect of Georgia history. After extensive research and careful restoration, the cabin was opened to the public in 2016. It is believed to be the second oldest extant Native American two-story residential structure.

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

 

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Filed under --FLOYD COUNTY GA--, Cave Spring GA

Braswell Methodist Church, 1926, Paulding County

Braswell Methodist is one of the most fascinating vernacular church buildings in Georgia. Its small utilitarian size as well as its local interpretation of the church form might seem crude to some, but they are proof that most rural Georgians did the best with the materials they had available. It stands not only as a testament to the faith of this small historical congregation but as a work of art in itself.

In the 1880s, Henry Braswell and New Yorker William McCracken opened a timber business, focused on crossties, in this section of Paulding County, and the nearby town was named for Braswell. It was a thriving village for about thirty years but was in decline by the 1920s. Mr. Braswell died in 1902 but not before donating land on Brushy Mountain for the purpose of building a Methodist Church. That congregation didn’t materialize until the early 1920s and this unique little church was completed around Christmas Day, 1926, with the first services coming early in the New Year of 1927. The church disbanded many years ago and is now owned by the City of Braswell.

Recently, a group of concerned local citizens, including descendants of members, has led an effort to restore the church.

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Filed under --PAULDING COUNTY GA--, Braswell GA

Willcoxon House, Circa 1860, Sargent

Colonel John B. Willcoxon built this house around the time he opened a grist mill near Wahoo Creek in the Lodi community. The grist mill opened in 1861 and remained in operation for five years. In 1866, with partners H. J. and George Sargent of Massachusetts, Colonel Willcoxon established the Willcoxon Manufacturing Company to produce cotton rope. The large four-story factory attracted many rural families to the area and primarily employed women and children. This was long before child labor laws prohibited such employment.

In 1888, H. C. Arnall, Sr., and T. G. Farmer purchased the enterprise and renamed it the Wahoo Manufacturing Company. The name of the town was officially changed to Sargent in 1892.

Sargent Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --COWETA COUNTY GA--, Sargent GA