Tag Archives: North Georgia Vernacular Architecture

Georgian Cottage, Hancock County

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Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--

Central Hallway House, Hardwick

Hardwick is adjacent to the grounds of Central State Hospital.

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Filed under --BALDWIN COUNTY GA--, Hardwick GA

Abandoned Church, Scottsboro

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Filed under --BALDWIN COUNTY GA--, Scottsboro GA

Concord United Methodist Church, Putnam County

William B. Pritchard and Thomas Johnston built a log church known as Victory in 1810, on the Milledgeville-Athens stagecoach road. The congregation changed its name to Concord in 1812. It was the first Methodist church west of the Oconee River. I have been unable to locate a date for the construction of the present structure.

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Filed under --PUTNAM COUNTY GA--

Uncle Remus Museum, 1963, Eatonton

Constructed from derelict slave cabins, the Uncle Remus Museum opened in Eatonton in 1963. Its location, Turner Park, was the boyhood homeplace of Joseph Sidney Turner, the inspiration for the “little boy” to whom “Uncle Remus” relayed all his critter stories in Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings (1880) and later works. Turner’s father, Joseph Addison Turner, owned Turnwold Plantation where Harris apprenticed as a teenager during the Civil War. A reconstructed blacksmith shop is also located in the park.

Carvings of many of the animal characters populate the grounds, which are a delight to walk around. I’m not sure who did all of these wonderful wood sculptures, but they’re a wonderful addition to the property. And forgive me if I confuse Bre’r Fox and Bre’r Wolf!

Bre’r Fox

Bre’r Wolf

Bre’r Bear

Bre’r Tarrypin

And last, but certainly not least, Bre’r Rabbit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --PUTNAM COUNTY GA--, Eatonton GA

Gabled-Ell Farmhouse, Jasper County

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Filed under --JASPER COUNTY GA--

Iron Springs Clubhouse, Butts County

This served for many years as the gathering place for the people of the Iron Springs community. The area is rich in history, as a historical marker placed by the Georgia Historical Commission in 1957 notes: On the night of Nov. 17, 1864, the Right Wing (15th and 17th Corps) of General Sherman’s army, which had marched south from Atlanta on Nov 15th on its destructive March to the sea, reached Jackson and camped in and around the town, Hq. Right Wing. Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, USA, and the headquarters of both corps were established in Jackson. Elements of the 17th Corps (Blair) moved forward to iron springs and camped here on the road to Planter’s Factory (Ocmulgee Mills) at Seven Islands (5 miles SE), the point which had been selected for the passage of the Right Wing, camped near Worthville (7 miles NW). That night the 29th Missouri Mounted Infantry seized the ferry at Seven Islands and secured both banks of the river for the passage. Next morning, the 1st Missouri Engineers passed through Iron Springs with the pontoons and, by 1:00 P.M., two bridges were ready and crossing operations had begun. Late that night, the 17th Corps having cleared Iron Springs, the Artillery Brigade arrived and went into camp. Although both bridges were in use day and night, heavy rains had made the roads so difficult that the passage was not completed until the afternoon of the 20th.

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Filed under --BUTTS COUNTY GA--