Tag Archives: North Georgia Pioneers

Rosser-Barron House, Circa 1818, Clinton

Built by Daniel Rosser, this house was owned by Wiley Pope at the beginning of the Civil War. It is also known as the W. W. Barron House, for longtime owner William Wiley Barron.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Lockett-Hamilton House, 1830, Clinton

This house was built by James Lockett. After the Civil War, it was home to James H. Blount, a lawyer who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1872-1892.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Parrish-Billue House, 1810, Clinton

This home was built for one of Jones County’s earliest settlers, Captain John Parrish, who also served as an early county commissioner. During the the March to the Sea, the residence was briefly occupied by Union General Kirkpatrick as a temporary headquarters. The smaller structure attached to the right side of the house was built in 1821 and in 1830 served as the law office of Alfred Iverson, Sr., and Samuel Lowther. Iverson went on to serve in the Georgia legislature, the House of Representatives, and the United States Senate. His son, Alfred Iverson, Jr., served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Clower-Gaultney House, 1816-1819, Clinton

This imposing house was built by early Clinton merchant Peter Clower. It originally featured round columns but they, along with many interior features, were removed by a later owner to another house.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

McCarthy-Pope House, 1809-1810, Clinton

This is the oldest surviving house in Clinton. It is believed to have been built by one of Jones County’s earliest settlers, Roger McCarthy. Following the Civil War, twin sisters “Miss Zet” and “Miss Pope” owned the house, which also served as the Clinton Post Office until 1915. After being used as a tenant house in subsequent years, it fell into a state of near ruin and was described as “tumbled down” by the mid-1950s. It was restored by the Old Clinton Historical Society in the late 1970s-eary 1980s.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Hutchings-Carr House, 1810-1811, Clinton

The Hutchings-Carr House was among the early substantial homes built by the settlers of Clinton, designated the Jones County seat in 1808, and incorporated in 1809. The Hutchings family were among the most prolific settlers of the pioneer community and builder Roger Hutchings served as tax collector, sheriff, and state representative for Jones County. His son Charles was a leading merchant in Clinton and later owned the house. The Federal-influenced Plantation Plain structure retains many original interior features, including carved sunburst friezes on the mantels. The house was expanded in the mid-19th century and the windows widened and lengthened. The front porch was added at this time.

Old Clinton Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --JONES COUNTY GA--, Clinton GA

Lowry Grist Mill Ruins, Euharlee

Euharlee was originally known as Burge’s  Mill, for the grist mill Nathaniel Burge operated on Euharlee Creek. The earlier mill burned around 1880 and was rebuilt by Daniel Lowry. Sections of the foundation are likely remnants of the original antebellum mill. A plan to rebuild the mill has been proposed, but I’m unsure of its status at this time.

 

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Filed under --BARTOW COUNTY GA--, Euharlee GA

William S. Simmons Plantation, 1840s, Cave Spring

The vernacular Greek Revival main house of the William S. Simmons Plantation, along with the adjacent Vann cookhouse, are two of the oldest extant brick structures in Floyd County. I was invited to photograph them earlier this year by owner Kristi Reed and am so glad I finally got to experience the charms of this important property, which continues to be a working farm. Kristi is very passionate about the Simmons Plantation and much of the following history is taken from her research. [PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS PRIVATE PROPERTY AND IT IS CLOSELY MONITORED FOR TRESPASSING]

Hidden in plain sight at the edge of downtown Cave Spring, the circa 1845-1847 landmark is built of handmade brick [18″ exterior walls/14″interior walls] and contains nine rooms, some of which retain hand-painted frescoes original to the house. It has also been known as the Montgomery Farm or Montgomery House, for subsequent owners.

As historically important as the main house, the double-pen brick cookhouse behind it was likely built no later than the mid-1820s by David Vann. Its initial use is not known, but considering that Vann was a wealthy planter who owned as many as 13 slaves, it is possible that it served as a slave dwelling before being relegated to use as a kitchen upon construction of the Simmons House. Vann, who was born at Cave Spring [Vann’s Valley] in 1800, was a member of one of the most prominent families of the Cherokee Nation and had a plantation house here preceding the Simmons house. [An interesting aside: Vann was the great-uncle of American humorist Will Rogers].

David Vann was a Cherokee sub-chief and after emigrating to the Indian Terriotry [present-day Oklahoma] in the mid-1830s, later served as Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation. He was murdered by a group of “Pin Indians” at Salina, Indian Territory, on 23 December 1863 and was buried at Haner Cemetery in Murphy. According to the Encylopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture, the derogatory term “Pin Indians” was applied by Treaty Party Cherokees to hostile, pro-Union Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole during the Civil War. The Pins were identified by cross pins worn on their coat lapels or calico shirts. They were disproportionately full bloods, wore turbans, adhered to the long-house culture, and were politically opposed to the frock-coated mixed-bloods who adhered to Southern white cultural norms and belonged to the Knights of the Golden Circle.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --FLOYD COUNTY GA--, Cave Spring GA

Willcoxon House, Circa 1860, Sargent

Colonel John B. Willcoxon built this house around the time he opened a grist mill near Wahoo Creek in the Lodi community. The grist mill opened in 1861 and remained in operation for five years. In 1866, with partners H. J. and George Sargent of Massachusetts, Colonel Willcoxon established the Willcoxon Manufacturing Company to produce cotton rope. The large four-story factory attracted many rural families to the area and primarily employed women and children. This was long before child labor laws prohibited such employment.

In 1888, H. C. Arnall, Sr., and T. G. Farmer purchased the enterprise and renamed it the Wahoo Manufacturing Company. The name of the town was officially changed to Sargent in 1892.

Sargent Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --COWETA COUNTY GA--, Sargent GA

Wick’s Tavern, Circa 1830, Villa Rica

Built within a few years of the establishment of Villa Rica, Wick’s Tavern is the oldest commercial structure in Carroll County and among the oldest in Northwest Georgia. The structure has had roof damage and needs stabilization.

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Filed under --CARROLL COUNTY GA--, Villa Rica GA