Tag Archives: North Georgia Museums

Old Greene County Jail, 1895, Greensboro

Within the same block in Greensboro are two historic jails, this being the ‘newer’ of the two. This Folk Victorian/Queen Anne example is typical of Georgia jails of the era, in which the sheriff kept a residence and everything was self-contained. It is now known as the L. L. Wyatt Museum, named in honor of the longtime Greene County Sheriff.

The historic marker on this site notes: This 1895 jail is named for the legendary Sheriff, Loy Lee Wyatt, who enforced the laws in Greene County for fifty-two years until his death in 1977. Sheriff L.L. Wyatt was born on January 2, 1904, in Paulding County. He was recruited to serve the citizens of Greene County due to his fast legs and honest reputation. In 1925, L.L. Wyatt began his law enforcement career as a Greene County policeman who waged a “one-man war” against the making of illegal corn whiskey. Prior to his arrival, moonshine production was considered the leading industry in Greene County and its produce was enjoyed in all of the finest hotels of Atlanta. After having rid the County of its moonshiners, Wyatt ran for the Office of Sheriff in 1940 defeating the incumbent. He served as Sheriff until he died in 1977. At the time of his death he was the longest standing Sheriff in the State, with thirty-seven years of service.

During his 37 years as Sheriff, Wyatt became a legend in his own time. Few men become legends and even fewer achieve the status of a “living legend” as did Sheriff Wyatt. He was a religious man who believed that God blessed him with protection during all of his fights, gun battles, and dangerous encounters. His law enforcement exploits exposed him to at least five gunshot wounds in the line of duty, in part due to the fact that he seldom carried a gun on his person, requiring him to retrieve it from his car at the sight of danger. In the early days of his career, when moonshiners resisted arrest, Wyatt regularly shot it out with them. He killed over a half dozen men, all of whom shot at him first.

The most famous gunfight of Sheriff Wyatt’s career occurred in 1974. He was 70 years old at the time. Bank robbers eluded a 100-car police chase that started in Wrens, Georgia, and ended in Greene County. The bank robbers had killed a teller at the bank in Wrens and had taken two women hostage. Sheriff Wyatt set up a road block midway between Union Point and Greensboro. Wyatt stood in the middle of the road as the speeding car approached. The robbers attempted to shoot him, but the gun misfired. One bank robber was killed in the ensuing battle, but both women were unharmed. Sheriff Wyatt subsequently received the award of the Peace Officer of he Year for his bravery in this incident.

Sheriff Wyatt was a family man, devoted to his wife, son, and grandchildren. He was a businessman, lending his experience to the operation and affairs of the Citizens Union Bank as a director. He was a community leader who had concern for all citizens – rich and poor, black and white. Out of a concern for these people, legend has it that Sheriff Wyatt confronted a notorious member of the Dixie Mafia and proclaimed, “These are my people and I want you to leave them alone!”

Sheriff Wyatt, also known as Mr. Sheriff, was the epitome of a community oriented police officer long before such an idea was born and served as an example for every officer to follow.

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Greensboro Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --GREENE COUNTY GA--, Greensboro GA

Old Barrow County Jail, 1915, Winder

The old Barrow County Jail has served as the Barrow County Museum since 1993. The “citadel sytle” was a common form for Georgia jails in the early 20th century.

Downtown Winder Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BARROW COUNTY GA--, Winder GA

The Big House-Allman Brothers Band Museum, Macon

The early history of this circa 1900 Tudor Revival is hard to track down today but its connection to the Allman Brothers Band make it an epicenter of Southern Rock history and a shrine to fans from all over the world. Known today as The Allman Brothers Band Museum at The Big House, it was rented by members of the band in January 1970 and a succession of wives, girlfriends, groupies, and industry types passed through until the end of 1972. Duane Allman and Berry Oakley were both living here at the times of their deaths in motorcycle crashes [29 October 1971 and 11 November 1972, respectively]. Dickey Betts wrote “Blue Sky” in the living room and “Ramblin’ Man” in the kitchen. By early 1973, the remaining band members and their families were gone from the house. It has since been restored and now maintains a world-class collection of Allman Brothers Band memorabilia and ephemera.

Vineville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Augusta, Gibson & Sandersville Railroad Depot, Circa 1886, Mitchell

This beautifully restored Victorian passenger and freight depot is the centerpiece of a nice public park and also houses a museum of local history. A similar depot survives down the line at Matthews. The Augusta, Gibson & Sandersville was the impetus for the settlement of Mitchell and the town grew rapidly as a result of the depot’s construction.

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Filed under --GLASCOCK COUNTY GA--, Mitchell GA

Sautee-Nacoochee School, 1928

Built to replace the  historic Nacoochee Institute, which was lost to fire in 1926, the Sautee-Nacoochee School and associated structures are known today as the Sautee-Nacooche Cultural Center. The school was abandoned in 1970 and its restoration and creative use should serve as a model for other communities. The 8-acre campus is also home to the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia.

Sautee Valley Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WHITE COUNTY GA--, Sautee-Nacoochee GA

Bank of Tignall, 1914

The cornerstone indicates that the bank was “Built for W. J. Adams and Brothers by Henry T. Hogan, Architect and Builder”. It is presently home to the North Wilkes Library & Museum.

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Filed under --WILKES COUNTY GA--, Tignall GA

Andalusia, Home of Flannery O’Connor, Baldwin County

After being diagnosed with lupus in 1951, famed American author Flannery O’Connor came to Andalusia to be cared for by her widowed mother, Regina Cline O’Connor. [While a student at Georgia College, I lived on the top floor of Ennis Hall for a year. It was located around the corner from the then derelict Cline-O’Connor mansion where Regina lived out her last days. One of my most vivid memories was seeing Mrs. O’Connor through a window in silhouette. She was a very private person.] Most of Flannery’s best-known work was written here. The property that became Andalusia was first occupied as a cotton plantation in 1814. The main house, seen above, was built in the 1850s. It was purchased by Flannery’s uncle, Dr. Bernard Cline, in 1931. During the Cline and O’Connor residencies, the 500+ acre property served as a working dairy and beef cattle farm. After Flannery’s death in 1964, the farm remained with the family until 2003, when it was donated to a private group for preservation. It was gifted to Georgia College in 2017, which now operates it as an historic house museum focused on interpreting the time Ms. O’Connor spent at the property.

Dr. Cline added the screened-in front porch during the 1930s.

The interior remains largely the same as it was during Flannery O’Connor’s residency here. Georgia College is doing an excellent job not only of preserving but interpreting these items in proper context.

The dining room doubled as a parlor and is the most visually interesting space in the house.

The stairwell is the most impressive feature of the foyer, though the upstairs rooms are not accessible to the public. They were used only for guests of the O’Connor family and storage.

Portraits of Dr. Bernard Cline (l) and Edward F. O’Connor

Portrait of Flannery O’Connor

Flannery’s bedroom is a large space at the western front of the house.  Braces, which she needed to get around as her lupus became more debilitating, are a stark reminder of the pain Flannery often endured.

Flannery spent many hours convalescing in this small bed.

The well house was built over a hand-dug brick-lined well. The farm was electrified in the 1940s and Regina had the water tower built in 1956. It’s 32 feet high and holds 22,000 gallons.

Dependencies of Andalusia

Away from the main house are numerous outbuildings which contributed to the productivity of the farm. They’re presently in various states of preservation, with eventual restoration the goal of Georgia College.

The most prominent structure, now located just northwest of the main house, is thought to be the original house of the plantation  which became Andalusia. It was located nearer the main house but was moved to its present location in the late 1940s or 1950s. Several smaller tenant houses are located south of the main house but are in ruins or terrible condition. I did not photograph them.

Robert Jack & Louise Hill, who were tenant farmers during most of Flannery O’Connor’s time at Andalusia, lived here. [Photo Courtesy Andalusia].

A dairy was established at Andalusia in 1947 by Regina and brother Louis Cline. The barn figures centrally in Flannery O’Connor’s beloved 1955 story, “Good Country People”.

Andalusia’s milk was processed offsite in Eatonton. This shed, likely built in the late 1940s, kept it cool until transport and was also used to sterilize the cans.

The calf barn was used to segregate male calves from their mothers so they could be fed powdered milk.

Regina and Louis began modernizing the farm by the early 1950s and this equipment shed allowed easy accessibility for tractors, bush hogs, and all manner of tools.

This barn sheltered the farm’s riding and working horses. On Mother’s Day 1962, Flannery gave Regina a Mexican burro named Ernest. A female Sicilian donkey, a jenny named Marquita, was later added to the farm. In September 1963, Ernest and Marquita had a foal Regina named Equinox. In the early 1970s, Marquita mated with a pony and gave birth to a hinny named Flossie. A hinny is the offspring of a horse and a jenny. Equinox and Flossie were companions until Equinox died in 1998. Flossie lived out her days at Andalusia until her death in 2010, becoming a bit of a celebrity herself with visitors and journalists who covered the property.

Though it looks old, the pump house is among the newest structures at Andalusia.

Just to the rear of the main house was a three-bay parking garage known as the Nail House. It became home to most of Flannery’s birds, including ducks, turkeys, geese, pheasants, and her beloved peafowl. Her first pair came from a breeder in Florida in 1952, and she would eventually have more than 40.

An aviary is presently sited to the east of the main house.

Of course, peafowl are kept on the property today. This pair was quite shy, though.

Grounds of Andalusia

Situated north of the Fall Line, Andalusia is characterized by rolling hills and beautiful hardwoods.

A tree-lined driveway leads to the main house.

A large hay pasture is located just to your left as you’re driving in. It’s a beautiful space which I remember admiring from US Highway 441 in my college days.

The view in front of the main house follows a gently sloping pasture to a secluded pond.

National Register of Historic Places

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --BALDWIN COUNTY GA--