Tag Archives: North Georgia Landmarks

Gabled-Ell Farmhouse, Glenloch

Other than a modern church building, little remains of the historic northeast Heard County community of Glenloch, which had a post office from 1886-1904.

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Filed under --HEARD COUNTY GA--, Glenloch GA

Prospect Church, Circa 1902, Texas

I believe this was originally a Methodist Church. It’s the only public building I was able to find in the crossroads community of Texas.

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Filed under --HEARD COUNTY GA--, Texas GA

Flat Rock Campground, 1879, Heard County

Flat Rock Campground was established by the Methodists circa 1876 and the tabernacle was built in 1879 by A. B. Lashley. All of the historic tents are gone from the property today, but the camp meeting is still active.

The John G. Davis Dining Hall served thousands of meals to attendees over the years. I’m not sure if it is still in use.

Decorative brackets are found at all corners of the tabernacle roof. They’re quite stylish for such a utilitarian structure.

 

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Traylor House, Circa 1832, Long Cane

This is one of the oldest surviving houses in the Long Cane community, which was settled around the time of the 1827 land lottery. I believe it was built by George Hamilton Traylor and was subsequently the home of his son, John Thomas Traylor.

The dominant architectural style of the house is Federal, but as 1832 is relatively late in the Federal period, the transition to the Greek Revival is evident. It is beautifully proportioned example, anchored by a large tetrastyle portico.

Thanks to Kaye Minchew for her assistance in helping me locate the house via the Troup County Archives.

 

Long Cane Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Long Cane Baptist Church, 1830s, Troup County

The Long Cane Baptist Church was constituted in 1829 by Reverend James Reeves. It was a union of Baptists and Presbyterians. The structure, still in use today, was erected in the mid-1830s and still retains its slave gallery, where enslaved people worshiped until the Civil War. The Presbyterians continued to worship here with the Baptists until forming their own congregation, Loyd Presbyterian, in 1887.

Long Cane Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

 

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, Long Cane GA

Eclectic Victorian House, West Point

This house, though decidedly Victorian in appearance, appears to be of earlier [probably antebellum] construction; hence my identification as an Eclectic Victorian. It’s possible that it was a Plantation Plain that was expanded later; it features nine-over-nine windows and the entryway has a transom and sidelights. I hope to learn more about it and will update it when I do. It’s an impressive house.

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, West Point GA

Miller-Price House, Circa 1875, West Point

This transitional Greek Revival-Victorian cottage was built for Alva C. Miller. It was purchased and restored by Miss Gladys Ozley in 1935.

 

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, West Point GA

Cobb-Ingram House, 1919, West Point

Neel Reid, one of Georgia’s most important 20th century architects, designed this home for local Coca-Cola bottler and distributor George Cobb in 1919. It has been owned by the Ingram family since 1974.

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, West Point GA

Lanier-Parr House, 1910, West Point

This home was built by Will Lanier, son of Elijah Frank Lanier and president of the Bank of West Point. His wife, Charlie Belle Collins Lanier, was a first cousin of Philip Trammell Shutze, one of Georgia’s most notable 20th century architects. The Lanier family were among the earliest investors in the local textile industry and had interests in banks and other businesses.

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, West Point GA

Lanier Building, 1884, West Point

When constructed by brothers Lanier and Ward Crockett Lanier in 1884, this commercial block was the tallest building in town, at three stories. A bank and several other businesses occupied the first floor. The general offices of the West Point Manufacturing Company were located on the second floor until the 1950s. The third floor served as the city’s 600-seat opera house; it was destroyed by a tornado on 28 March 1920 and was never rebuilt.

West Point Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --TROUP COUNTY GA--, West Point GA