Tag Archives: North Georgia Landmarks

McCurry-Hodges House, 1892, Hartwell

This Queen Anne, often noted as one of the oldest in Hartwell, was built by attorney Asbury McCurry. His daughter Eloise married Judge Walter Hodges. After his death, she served on Governor Ellis Arnold’s advisory board and as Capitol postmistress during the week, returning here on weekends.

Benson Street-Forest Avenue Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HART COUNTY GA--, Hartwell GA

Skelton House, 1896, Hartwell

This Victorian landmark has been fully restored and now serves as a bed and breakfast, The Skelton House.

Benson Street-Forest Avenue Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HART COUNTY GA--, Hartwell GA

Maylon Richardson House, 1881, Hartwell

Benson Street-Forest Avenue Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HART COUNTY GA--, Hartwell GA

Hartwell City School, 1934

Built in the Georgian Revival style popular with public schoolhouses in the 1930s, the Hartwell Elementary School, as it’s now known, is still in use. It originally served grades 1-11. Atlanta architects Sidney S. Daniell and Russell Lee Beutell were responsible for the design. A WPA gymnasium (not pictured) was constructed in 1939.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HART COUNTY GA--, Hartwell GA

Georgian Cottage, Hart County

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Ocmulgee National Monument, Macon

Entrance to Earth Lodge

Archaeologists have determined that human habitation at this Mississippian site, formerly known as the Ocmulgee Old Fields and now the Ocmulgee National Monument, dates back at least 17,000 years.

Interior of Earth Lodge, with Eagle Platform

The Earth Lodge was uncovered by Dr. A. R. Kelley in 1934. It was reconstructed between 1933 and 1938. It served as a Mississippian Council House. The original clay floor, with the raised eagle platform, was exposed by employees of the Civil Works Administration and Work Projects Administration under the direction of James A. Ford. The Mississippians had burned the lodge, perhaps as an act of ritual cleansing or something entirely different. The charred remains of the construction, dated to 1015 AD, were arrayed in a spoke pattern and protected the original floor. The roof was not originally covered with sod, but it has been employed today to preserved the site.

Rear View of Earth Lodge

One should keep in mind that during the Mississippian Period, these mounds were not covered in grass but rather in the natural clay of the landscape.

Great Temple Mound

This is Early Mississippian flat-topped temple mound, 300 feet wide by 270 feet long by 40 feet high, is one of several in widely scattered locations across Georgia. It dates to circa 900-1100 AD. It was the principal religious structure at the Ocmulgee site till at least 1200 AD.  A lesser mound (not pictured) stands adjacent to this one.

Cornfield Mound

Excavations on this site uncovered parallel rows of charred corn cobs dating to circa 900AD-1200AD, indicating an early agricultural use. At some point, the field was transformed into a mound. The mound is 90 feet wide by 160 feet long by 6 feet high.

Prehistoric Trenches

These trenches can be found in several locations around Ocmulgee National Monument. These, near the Cornfield Mound, are 18 feet wide by 7 feet deep. It is unclear as to whether they were defensive in nature or if they were borrow pits for the mounds.

Ocmulgee National Monument Visitors Center

Constructed between 1938-1951, the Streamline Moderne visitors center is a landmark in its own right. It houses a wonderful collection of artifacts collected on the site.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, --CARROLL COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Holt-Peeler-Snow House, 1840, Macon

Built for Judge Thaddeus Goode Holt by Elam Alexander, this is one of the finest Greek Revival houses in Macon. Judge Holt was one of the most prominent citizens of early Macon, accompanying the Marquis de LaFayette on his 1825 visit at the behest of the governor. In addition to serving sa Judge of the County Court, he also served on the city council and was involved in numerous business pursuits. Judge Holt’s son, Thaddeus, Jr., served in several Confederate military units and was also Judge of the County Court. His granddaughter, Nanaline Holt, first married Will Inman, of the prominent Atlanta family, and later married the tobacco magnate James Buchanan Duke. They were the parents of Doris Duke. Numerous owners followed, including: Joseph Dannenberg; E. L. Martin; Leon I. Dure; Amp Peeler; and William A. Snow, Jr. It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA