Tag Archives: North Georgia Houses

Traylor House, Circa 1832, Long Cane

This is one of the oldest surviving houses in the Long Cane community, which was settled around the time of the 1827 land lottery. I believe it was built by George Hamilton Traylor and was subsequently the home of his son, John Thomas Traylor.

The dominant architectural style of the house is Federal, but as 1832 is relatively late in the Federal period, the transition to the Greek Revival is evident. It is beautifully proportioned example, anchored by a large tetrastyle portico.

Thanks to Kaye Minchew for her assistance in helping me locate the house via the Troup County Archives.

 

Long Cane Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Eclectic Victorian House, West Point

This house, though decidedly Victorian in appearance, appears to be of earlier [probably antebellum] construction; hence my identification as an Eclectic Victorian. It’s possible that it was a Plantation Plain that was expanded later; it features nine-over-nine windows and the entryway has a transom and sidelights. I hope to learn more about it and will update it when I do. It’s an impressive house.

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Miller-Price House, Circa 1875, West Point

This transitional Greek Revival-Victorian cottage was built for Alva C. Miller. It was purchased and restored by Miss Gladys Ozley in 1935.

 

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Cobb-Ingram House, 1919, West Point

Neel Reid, one of Georgia’s most important 20th century architects, designed this home for local Coca-Cola bottler and distributor George Cobb in 1919. It has been owned by the Ingram family since 1974.

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Lanier-Parr House, 1910, West Point

This home was built by Will Lanier, son of Elijah Frank Lanier and president of the Bank of West Point. His wife, Charlie Belle Collins Lanier, was a first cousin of Philip Trammell Shutze, one of Georgia’s most notable 20th century architects. The Lanier family were among the earliest investors in the local textile industry and had interests in banks and other businesses.

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Sunny Gables, 1926, LaGrange

The prolific Georgia architect P. Thornton Marye designed this Tudor Revival for Mary and Julia Nix. The Nix sisters were among the benefactors who helped save LaGrange College from financial ruin in the years following World War I. It has served as the School of Nursing and presently, the Alumni House.

Broad Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Hood-Copeland House, 1907, LaGrange

This Neoclassical Revival house was built by local contractor E. D. Roberts for Mr. & Mrs. E. Glover Hood. Mrs. Hood was the granddaughter of Phillip Hunter Greene, who built The Oaks, next door. Dr. & Mrs. Robert Copeland purchased in 1969 and Mrs. Copeland was very active in preservation efforts throughout the community.

Vernon Road Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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The Oaks, 1843, LaGrange

Phillip Hunter Greene took three years to select the timbers for this house, which an 1883 LaGrange Reporter article declared “…the best built framed house in LaGrange…”. Greene was a successful inventor of improvements in sawmills, plows, and fencing. Grover Cleaveland purchased the home for his sister Etta Dodd in 1914. It was the boyhood home of Lamar Dodd, perhaps Georgia’s most accomplished artist of the 20th century.

Vernon Road Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Hutchinson-Parham House, 1940, LaGrange

This imposing landmark of the Mediterranean Revival style was built for Robert and Florence Hutchinson in 1940*. It is notable in that it was built by one Georgia’s first woman architects, Ellamae Ellis League (1899-1991) of Macon. Ms. League was the first Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in Georgia and one of only eight in the nation at the time of her death. She designed high schools, hospitals, gymnasiums, and other public facilities, as well as numerous residential commissions. She oversaw the renovation and restoration of the Grand Opera House in Macon.  Her daughter and a grandson also became architects.

Of Ms. League, Bamby Ray writes: League became an architect by necessity. In 1922, divorced at age twenty-three with two small children, she entered a profession for which she had no training. Her husband of five years had left her with no financial resources, and she needed to find employment. Six generations of her family, including an uncle in Atlanta, [Charles Ellis Choate, one of Georgia’s most prolific architects in his lifetime] had been architects. She joined a Macon firm as an apprentice and remained there for the next six years, as she managed both office and child-rearing duties. During that time League also took correspondence courses from the Beaux Arts Institute of Design in New York City.

*- Travels through Troup County: A Guide to its Architecture and History dates the house to 1916, but I believe this to have been an oversight.

 

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Lewis-Cary House, Circa 1850, LaGrange

This classic Italianate cottage was built for Nicholas Lewis. During the Civil War, it was occupied by refugees from various Southern states. A prominent local physician, Dr. Henry Hamilton Cary, purchased the home in 1869.

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