Tag Archives: North Georgia Greek Revival Architecture

Mercer Institute Science Building, 1853, Penfield

Photo Courtesy of Lamar Sanders

I’m excited to be able to share this historic photograph of the Science Building of the Mercer Institute, predecessor of Mercer University in Macon. It was graciously shared by Lamar Sanders, who took it in 1970. Almost certainly the work of builder/architect David Demarest, the Greek Revival structure served as the Penfield Village School after Mercer moved to Macon, but was badly damaged by a fire in 1977 and eventually demolished.

 

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Filed under --GREENE COUNTY GA--, Penfield GA

First Presbyterian Church, 1848, Clarkesville

Reverend William Quillian organized the First Presbyterian Church of Clarkesville in 1832, with seven charter members. They met in the Methodist church in their early years. The present structure was built in 1848 by Jarvis Van Buren, first cousin of President Martin Van Buren. The dedication sermon was delivered by the Reverend Nathan Hoyt, grandfather of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson. Members of the congregation included two Attorneys General, John McPherson Berrien and Amos T. Akerman. In 1907, when part of the church lot was sold to W. R. Asbury, the building was turned around from its location facing Jefferson Street to its present location.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --HABERSHAM COUNTY GA--, Clarkesville GA

Independence United Methodist Church, 1871, Tignall

From the historical marker placed in 1978: Old Independence Church, built for all denominations, was situated near the campground across the road from its present site. The Methodists organized a membership and claimed the church. The matter was carried to the courts. A young lawyer, Robert Toombs, defended the Methodists and won the case. The beginning of the Old Independence was around 1783, and it became a Methodist Church in the 1830s. In 1840, Thomas L. Wooten deeded the lot on which the Old Church building stood to the trustees. In 1870, this church building was sold to the black people who moved it to land given them to them in Tignall. A new church building was erected, and in 1871 Bishop George F. Pierce preached the dedication sermon. A Sunday school celebration was held in 1879 with almost 1,000 attending. Dr. A. G. Haygood, President of Emory College delivered the address. The church has been remodeled many times. In 1930 the Church School Annex was added and a Fellowship Hall was built in 1974. Many prominent families in the county have been identified as members of this church. Several have been licensed to preach at her altars, the more prominent being, Reverend J.W. Hinton, D.D., a preacher and writer of national fame.

It is known that enslaved persons attended services here, as well.

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Filed under --WILKES COUNTY GA--, Tignall GA

Thomas Long House, Circa 1854, Paoli

This was the home of Thomas Wilson Long (15 September 1784-21 July 1861), who came to Georgia from Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was the uncle of medical pioneer Crawford W. Long and is buried nearby in the New Hope Presbyterian Church Cemetery. I will update information on subsequent owners as I learn more. The 1854 date is probably incorrect; some have suggested 1830s is more likely.

The house is surrounded by pristine farmland on one of the most beautiful backroads in the area.

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Filed under --MADISON COUNTY GA--, Paoli GA

Wellborn Plantation, Circa 1795, Warrenton

This is one of Warrenton’s oldest and most historic homes. It was once the center of a large working plantation. In 1858, the owner,  George Washington Hardaway, willed the plantation to his daughter, Frances Markham Hardaway Wellborn (Mrs. Marshall Wellborn).

 

 

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Filed under --WARREN COUNTY GA--, Warrenton GA

Harley-Harris-Rives House, 1840s, Sparta

This landmark house was built in the late 1840s as a wedding gift for William Harley and Mary Battle, and was home to the Harris and Rives families thereafter. Like most grand residences of its time in the South, it was built with slave labor. It was restored in the early 2000s by Suzy and Robert Currey and is today surrounded by their organic farming operations.

Sparta Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--, Sparta GA

William J. Clark House, Circa 1856, Elberton

William J. Clark was a merchant and one of the leading citizens of Elbert County when he built this home, which may have originated as a Plantation Plain with Greek Revival elements added later. Clark was killed in the Civil War. Thanks to Anna King O’Neal for the identification.

Elberton Residential Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --ELBERT COUNTY GA--, Elberton GA