Tag Archives: Macon GA

Ocmulgee National Monument, Macon

Entrance to Earth Lodge

Archaeologists have determined that human habitation at this Mississippian site, formerly known as the Ocmulgee Old Fields and now the Ocmulgee National Monument, dates back at least 17,000 years.

Interior of Earth Lodge, with Eagle Platform

The Earth Lodge was uncovered by Dr. A. R. Kelley in 1934. It was reconstructed between 1933 and 1938. It served as a Mississippian Council House. The original clay floor, with the raised eagle platform, was exposed by employees of the Civil Works Administration and Work Projects Administration under the direction of James A. Ford. The Mississippians had burned the lodge, perhaps as an act of ritual cleansing or something entirely different. The charred remains of the construction, dated to 1015 AD, were arrayed in a spoke pattern and protected the original floor. The roof was not originally covered with sod, but it has been employed today to preserved the site.

Rear View of Earth Lodge

One should keep in mind that during the Mississippian Period, these mounds were not covered in grass but rather in the natural clay of the landscape.

Great Temple Mound

This is Early Mississippian flat-topped temple mound, 300 feet wide by 270 feet long by 40 feet high, is one of several in widely scattered locations across Georgia. It dates to circa 900-1100 AD. It was the principal religious structure at the Ocmulgee site till at least 1200 AD.  A lesser mound (not pictured) stands adjacent to this one.

Cornfield Mound

Excavations on this site uncovered parallel rows of charred corn cobs dating to circa 900AD-1200AD, indicating an early agricultural use. At some point, the field was transformed into a mound. The mound is 90 feet wide by 160 feet long by 6 feet high.

Prehistoric Trenches

These trenches can be found in several locations around Ocmulgee National Monument. These, near the Cornfield Mound, are 18 feet wide by 7 feet deep. It is unclear as to whether they were defensive in nature or if they were borrow pits for the mounds.

Ocmulgee National Monument Visitors Center

Constructed between 1938-1951, the Streamline Moderne visitors center is a landmark in its own right. It houses a wonderful collection of artifacts collected on the site.

 

 

 

 

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Holt-Peeler-Snow House, 1840, Macon

Built for Judge Thaddeus Goode Holt by Elam Alexander, this is one of the finest Greek Revival houses in Macon. Judge Holt was one of the most prominent citizens of early Macon, accompanying the Marquis de LaFayette on his 1825 visit at the behest of the governor. In addition to serving as Judge of the County Court, he also served on the city council and was involved in numerous business pursuits. Judge Holt’s son, Thaddeus, Jr., served in several Confederate military units and was also Judge of the County Court. His granddaughter, Nanaline Holt, first married Will Inman, of the prominent Atlanta family, and later married the tobacco magnate James Buchanan Duke. They were the parents of Doris Duke. Numerous owners followed, including: Joseph Dannenberg; E. L. Martin; Leon I. Dure; Amp Peeler; and William A. Snow, Jr.

It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

National Register of Historic Places

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Raines-Miller-Carmichael House, Circa 1848, Macon

Designed by Elam Alexander for Judge Cadwallader Raines in the shape of a modified Greek cross with rooms branching out in four directions from a central octagonal hall, this is one of Macon’s finest homes. A spectacular spiral staircase originates in the foyer and leads to the octagonal cupola. The porches originally ran alongside the rooms, conforming to the shape of the house, but were later changed to their current circular fashion.

Judge Raines died in 1856 and his wife in 1860, leaving no heirs. The house was sold to Central Bank of Georgia president John E. Jones in 1869 and later came into the possession of Dr. George T. Miller before being purchased by Robert Joseph Carmichael.

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Rogers-Johnson-Stallworth House, 1878, Macon

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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George W. Duncan House, 1886, Macon

Later owners of this house were the Brown, Smith, and Dorminey families.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Newsome-Willingham-Carswell House, Circa 1885, Macon

Now known as the Hubble House Apartments, this Neoclassical Revival landmark that looks amazingly similar to the White House, has a bit of a confusing history. Macon: An Architectural & Historical Guide notes: Within this…mansion…is a Victorian house…In 1904 Mr. E. J. Willingham enlarged the house and changed its style by adding the imposing colonnade, which originally had 18 Corinthian columns. Later additions enclosed the side porches…In 1906, the house was the site of the first national convention of the Alpha Delta Pi sorority…

Macon Historic District, National Register of  Historic Places

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McHatton-Wood-McGhee House, 1880, Macon

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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