Tag Archives: Georgia Granite

Arnold Cotton Gin, Arnoldsville

Local tradition suggests that this gin was built of Georgia granite to replace an earlier frame structure destroyed by a tornado in the early 1900s, though I am unable to confirm this. It was operational until at least the 1950s and was established by Nathaniel (Nat.) Dowdy Arnold (1859-1928), who was the namesake of this small agricultural community. Arnold’s wife was Annie Susan Callaway (1863-1901), from the Callaway Plantation in Wilkes County.

Nathaniel Dowdy Arnold in William J. Northen, Men of Mark in Georgia, Volume VII, A . B. Campbell Publishing, Atlanta, 1912. Public Domain.

The original settlement, dating to the 1770s, was established near an important Native American trading route and was known as Cherokee Corner. By 1811, a sawmill, gin, and general store were present in the community. A Presbyterian minister named Safford operated the Cherokee Corner Academy and until at least the 1840s was involved in the cultivation of silkworm cocoons.

In 1894, local merchant Edwin Shaw established a post office and named the village Edwin after himself. In 1896, Nathaniel D. Arnold bought Shaw’s store and his postal rights and the town became Arnoldsville.

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Filed under --OGLETHORPE COUNTY GA--, Arnoldsville GA

Bowen Family Cemetery, 1830s, Carroll County

This fascinating cemetery is located in the McIntosh Reserve Park, a property associated with Chief William McIntosh and maintained as a public park by Carroll County.

The Bowen family were pioneers in this area and likely had some connection to Chief McIntosh, perhaps as traders or through some other association.

The earliest discernible burial in the cemetery dates to 1830.

Though many names have been lost over time, this cemetery is important not only for its historical connection to early settlers but for its limestone slab (or other local stone?) tombs, which are quite rare today.

It’s a well-preserved example of a family burying ground utilizing materials on hand and offers a fascinating glimpse into the funerary practices of early-19th century rural Georgia

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Filed under --CARROLL COUNTY GA--

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 1899, Athens

Emmanuel is the oldest Episcopal congregation in Athens, dating to 1842. When Dr. Richard Dudley Moore brought his new wife, Elizabeth Stockton, to Athens in 1835 she was concerned that there was no Episcopal church in the city. The daughter of the governor of Delaware and a granddaughter of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Elizabeth had been a member of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in her native state. When the congregation was organized by Dr. William Bacon Stevens, the name was chosen to honor her. A New England-style structure was built in 1843 but by the 1890s the congregation had outgrown it. The cornerstone was laid in 1895 and this Gothic chapel, sided in Georgia granite, was completed in 1899.

Cobbham Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --CLARKE COUNTY GA--, Athens GA

Georgia Guidestones, 1980, Elbert County

Known as the Georgia Guidestones and standing nearly 20 feet high, the six granite slabs situated beside a field nine miles north of Elberton have become a curious tourist attraction since their erection in 1980. Because of the anonymous origin and patronage of the guidestones, controversy has always surrounded them.  In their April 2009 issue, Wired dubbed them the “American Stonehenge” and published a great essay on their history and the ensuing conspiracy theories. They noted that they may be the most enigmatic monument in America…inscribed with directions for rebuilding civilization after the apocalypse.

Four slabs radiate from a central slab with a capstone atop the array which, when viewed from above give the appearance of a star. Ten guidelines are inscribed on the guidestones in eight modern languages (English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, Russian) with a shorter message inscribed on top in four ancient languages (Babylonian Cuneiform, Classic Greek, Sanskrit, Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs) . The ten guidelines, translated, are: 1) Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
2) Guide reproduction wisely-improving diversity and fitness. 3) Unite humanity with a living new language. 4) Rule passion-faith-tradition-and all things with tempered reason. 5) Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts. 6) Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court. 7) Avoid petty laws and useless officials. 8) Balance personal rights with social duties. 9) Prize truth-beauty-love-seeking harmony with the infinite. 10) Be not a cancer on the earth- Leave room for nature- Leave room for nature.

An explanatory tablet, a few feet away from the Guidestones, notes the date of dedication (22 March 1980), identifies the languages used and the astronomical coordinates of the site, and reads: Let these be guidestones to an Age of Reason.

 

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Filed under --ELBERT COUNTY GA--

Smith’s Store, Madison County

Madison County GA Country Store Georgia Granite Siding Photogrpah Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

Sided with Georgia granite, this old store is located at the intersection of Highway 72 and Paoli Road. Thanks to Sid and Marie Adams for the identification.

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Filed under --MADISON COUNTY GA--

Georgia Railroad Depot, 1848, Crawforfd

Crawford GA Oglethorpe County Georgia Railway Depot Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

From the December 2010 issue of Preservation Posts (Historic Preservation Division, DNR)

The depot was constructed with granite block, likely including a few granite cross ties that were used along the rail line before the advent of heavy steam engines required their replacement with more flexible wooden cross ties.  Depots constructed entirely from stone are extremely rare in Georgia.  Most depots are constructed from wood or brick with only a few built with the exterior walls entirely constructed from granite block.  The depot, built to serve the Athens branch of the Georgia Railroad, also served the towns of Arnoldsville, Dunlop, Maxeys, Union Point, and Woodville.  The depot also served as a shipment and supply facility for the Confederate Army during the Civil War…”

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --OGLETHORPE COUNTY GA--, Crawford GA

Old Hancock County Jail, 1905, Sparta

Old Hancock County Jail Sparta GA Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

This sturdy old granite structure was recently restored.

Sparta Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--, Sparta GA