Tag Archives: Antebellum North Georgia

Reynolds House, Mayfield

One historic resource survey dates this Plantation Plain/I-House to circa 1860, but I believe it was built earlier than that. Other than the name of the first owner, I have been unsuccessful at locating more history.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--, Mayfield GA

Plantation Plain House, Ricketson

This transitional Federal I-House/Plantation Plain appears to date to early in the 19th century. I’ve not been able to locate any history of the house, but regarding the community, Greg Morrison, who lives nearby, notes: The Ricketson area was a militia district as well as Reese, Newsomes, Neals and English. All these areas are geographically connected and were all named for men who served in the Revolutionary War. He also suggests that he understands that this house was originally a dogtrot.

1 Comment

Filed under --WARREN COUNTY GA--, Ricketson GA

Thomas Lumsden House, Circa 1854, Talbot County

The Greek Revival plantation home of Thomas Reid Lumsden is truly exceptional, featuring carved columns and 12-over-12 windows. It has remained in the same family throughout its history.

In his monumental history A Rockaway in Talbot: Travels in an Old Georgia County [Hester Printing, 1985], William H. Davidson notes that Lumsden made his way to Talbot County when he married his second wife, Virgina Pierce Leonard in 1853. They lived for a time in Floyd County but were back in Talbot, building this house circa 1853-1854.

Davidson also points out the influence of Andrew Jackson Downing’s 1850 pattern book The Architecture of Country Houses. He notes The verandah of the Lumsden house was very likely adapted therefrom by Urban Cooper Tigner, contractor and builder of the house, his own nearby plantation house, and the Collinsworth United Methodist Church. Thanks to Jim Bruce for sharing scans from Davidson’s book.

Thanks to Trae Ingram for the identification.

Leave a comment

Filed under --TALBOT COUNTY GA--

Collinsworth United Methodist Church, 1834, Talbot County

The South Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church notes: Collinsworth was organized prior to 1830, by a band of Methodists meeting at the home of George Menifee. The first church was a log cabin called Menifee’s Meeting House. They built the present structure in 1834 and named it for Reverend John Collinsworth, a former pastor. The dedication service, by Reverend Lovick Pierce, wasn’t held until 1859.

Collinsworth is a fine example of a vernacular Greek Revival church, evident in the locally executed Ionic capitals (above). The builder was Urban Cooper Tigner, owner of a nearby plantation and a self-taught architect/contractor. Tigner also built the Lumsden House.

5 Comments

Filed under --TALBOT COUNTY GA--, Ypsilanti GA

Vernacular Farmhouse, Circa 1856, Talbot County

One resource survey identifies the date of construction of this Georgian farmhouse at 1856.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under --TALBOT COUNTY GA--

Lanier House, Circa 1860, Hancock County

This is part of the Shoulderbone Plantation property, to my understanding, and was owned by the Lanier family for many years. I’m unsure who the original owners were.

Leave a comment

Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--

John S. Jackson House, Circa 1850, Hancock County

This imposing Greek Revival plantation home, situated on a high point overlooking acres of gently rolling hills and pristine farmland, was built by William Jackson for his son, John Swinney Jackson and his first wife, Artemesia Hall. The elder Jackson acquired the property from William Knowles in 1832. John Jackson, who had lived all of his life in Hancock and Greene Counties developed the property, through slave labor, into a thriving agricultural operation. At the outset of the Civil War, Jackson owned over 1000 acres and 38 enslaved Africans. Like most Georgians, Jackson served the Confederate cause and the futile effort ended in his loss of the plantation. It was purchased by Robert M. Grimes in 1870 who sold it to James M. Harris in 1874. Grimes reacquired it in 1880, but after a lawsuit over debts sold it back to Harris in 1881. Harris sold it to Henry Thomas Lewis in 1900. Lewis was an Associate Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court who lived in Greensboro and Siloam, keeping the plantation as a country retreat. After Lewis’s death, his widow sold the plantation to Jeff W. N. Lanier, whose family owned neighboring lands. Subsequent owners were D. B. Taylor and Dorsey L. Campbell. Campbell’s daughter, Alice Hartley, deeded the house back to the Lanier family in 1982.

The property is known today as Shoulderbone Plantation, for the historical Shoulderbone Creek which runs nearby.

National Register of Historic Places

 

2 Comments

Filed under --HANCOCK COUNTY GA--

Old Gaol, 1807, Greensboro

The oldest masonry jail in Georgia, Greensboro’s ‘Old Gaol’ is distinguished by its English spelling, which seems fitting considering the structure’s appearance. Locally quarried granite was used in construction, which was patterned after European citadels known for their harsh conditions. The downstairs cells were dark and catacomb-like, reserved for particularly unsavory characters. Such prisoners were chained to the walls with absolutely no creature comforts, including heat or ventilation. Non-violent criminals were placed upstairs, where conditions weren’t much better, but at least allowed for outside light. A trap-door gallows is also present. The jail served Greene County until 1895, when a more modern jail was constructed.

Greensboro Commercial Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --GREENE COUNTY GA--, Greensboro GA

Bellheart, Circa 1810, Greensboro

Tax records (which aren’t always reliable) indicate this was constructed circa 1810, though later surveys by preservationists have dated it circa 1850 and 1860. There do seem to be hints of Federal origins, supporting the earlier date, but I will have to do more research.

North Street-East Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --GREENE COUNTY GA--, Greensboro GA

Central Hallway Farmhouse, Circa 1840s, Greene County

 

Leave a comment

Filed under --GREENE COUNTY GA--