Tag Archives: Antebellum North Georgia

Holt-Peeler-Snow House, 1840, Macon

Built for Judge Thaddeus Goode Holt by Elam Alexander, this is one of the finest Greek Revival houses in Macon. Judge Holt was one of the most prominent citizens of early Macon, accompanying the Marquis de LaFayette on his 1825 visit at the behest of the governor. In addition to serving sa Judge of the County Court, he also served on the city council and was involved in numerous business pursuits. Judge Holt’s son, Thaddeus, Jr., served in several Confederate military units and was also Judge of the County Court. His granddaughter, Nanaline Holt, first married Will Inman, of the prominent Atlanta family, and later married the tobacco magnate James Buchanan Duke. They were the parents of Doris Duke. Numerous owners followed, including: Joseph Dannenberg; E. L. Martin; Leon I. Dure; Amp Peeler; and William A. Snow, Jr. It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

National Register of Historic Places

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Raines-Miller-Carmichael House, Circa 1848, Macon

Designed by Elam Alexander for Judge Cadwallader Raines in the shape of a modified Greek cross with rooms branching out in four directions from a central octagonal hall, this is one of Macon’s finest homes. A spectacular spiral staircase originates in the foyer and leads to the octagonal cupola. The porches originally ran alongside the rooms, conforming to the shape of the house but were later changed to their current circular fashion.

Judge Raines died in 1856 and his wife in 1860, leaving no heirs. The house was sold to Central Bank of Georgia president John E. Jones in 1869 and later came into the possession of Dr. George T. Miller before being purchased by Robert Joseph Carmichael.

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Beall-Jordan-Dunlap House, 1860, Macon

When built for plantation owner Nathan Beall, this house was a large but simple Victorian. He later sold it Leonadius H. Jordan, owner of the Academy of Music (today’s Grand Opera House). Jordan died in 1899 and in 1900 it was restored by Confederate Captain Samuel S. Dunlap, the most significant change being the addition of 18 Corinthian columns. During World War II, it was a boarding house and tea room operated by Mrs. Robert Lasseter. A photo of The Allman Brothers standing on the front porch of the house, looking a bit worse for wear, graces the cover of their eponymous debut album in 1969. In the 1970s and 1980s it was one of Macon’s most popular restaurants, known as Beall’s 1860. In 2001 it was restored by Gus Bell and donated to Mercer University in 2008. Today, it’s home to Mercer University’s Robert McDuffie Center for Strings.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Rock Rogers House, Circa 1840, Macon

This home, one of the first on College Street,  was built by GeorgeTyler Rogers, and early settler of Macon. His son, William Rokenbaugh “Rock” Rogers, lived here after George’s death.

National Register of Historic Places

4 Comments

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Judge Clifford Anderson House, 1859, Macon

This Tuscan-inspired Victorian is one of the most architecturally interesting houses in the Orange Street neighborhood and a well-loved Macon landmark. It was built by Judge Clifford Anderson, who practiced law with Sidney Lanier’s father Robert for a time in Macon. He was also the brother of Sidney Lanier’s mother Mary Jane. In 1846, Anderson served as the first president of the Macon chapter of the YMCA. Anderson was a member of the Confederate Congress and a captain in the Floyd Rifles. He served several terms in the state legislature after the war and also served as state Attorney General.

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Virgil Powers House, Circa 1841, Macon

Macon: An Architectural & Historical Guide (Middle Georgia Historical Society, Macon, 1996) notes that the first owner of this house was Virgil Powers, who served as superintendent of the Southwestern Railroad, a surveyor for the railroad to Savannah in 1834, a city alderman and a charter member of the Bibb County Board of Education. It was originally a simple frame house with Italianate and Neoclassical elements added later. Other owners listed are LeConte and Blackshear. The only LeConte I can locate in Macon in the antebellum era is Joseph LeConte, who maintained a medical practice in Macon from 1847 to 1850.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

also LeConte Blackshear Powers House with an 1841 date?

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Munroe-Dunalp-Snow House, Circa 1857, Macon

Nathaniel Campbell Munroe built this around 1857 as a simple five-room central hallway cottage with a plain front. The Victorian details were added at a later date; that may have been done in 1878, as a local historical marker associates that date with the house. Munroe was a prominent figure in early Macon, serving as secretary of the Board of Health and the Macon Lyceum & Library Society. director of the Macon & Western Railway Company and of the Macon Manufacturing Company. He was also a warden of Christ Church and a trustee of the Georgia Academy for the Blind. He sold the property in 1862. One of the owners was Captain Samuel S. Dunlap, who organized the Bibb County Cavalry and was wounded at Gettysburg. He opened the first hardware store in Macon in 1866. In 1903, Peter J. Bracken, engineer of the “Texas” in the Great Locomotive Chase, died here while visiting relatives. The William A. Snow family were later owners who made great improvements to the property and grounds.

National Register of Historic Places

2 Comments

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA