Tag Archives: Antebellum North Georgia

Columbia County Courthouse, 1856, Appling

Columbia County was created in 1790. The area was settled by Daniel Marshall and the Baptists in 1772. The dead town of Cobbham served briefly as the first county seat, followed by Kiokee, near the Savannah River. Because Kiokee was considered too far from much of the population to be a practical site, William Appling offered land for a new county seat and it was named in his honor. The first courthouse in Appling was built around 1793, followed by a more suitable structure in 1812. It served until the construction of the present courthouse in 1856.

Columbia County is perhaps unique in Georgia in that it has essentially two county seats. By the 1970s,  this courthouse was in a bad state of deterioration. Since the county was in the midst of a population boom and the majority of the population was clustered near Evans, the Appling courthouse was no longer adequate for housing all the offices of local government. Around 1980 a new Columbia County Government Center was constructed in Evans, with additional facilities following in the 1990s. Most functions of local government are now carried out there, while a few offices are maintained in this historic antebellum courthouse.  Some court proceedings are still held here, making it the oldest courthouse in the state still in use.

National Register of Historic Places

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under --COLUMBIA COUNTY GA--, Appling GA

Kiokee Baptist Church, 1808, Appling

When Daniel Marshall established the oldest continuing* Baptist congregation in Georgia in 1772, it was a violation of the established laws of St. Paul’s Parish, contrary to the tenets of the Church of England, and he was soon arrested. Upon his release he continued the mission of the church and built the first meeting house at the site of present-day Appling. A new church known as Marshall’s Meeting House was built in 1789 near the banks of Kiokee Creek. By 1806 Marshall’s Meeting House was in bad disrepair and the congregation raised nearly $4000 for the construction of the present church, known as Kiokee Baptist Church, which was completed in 1808. A Mr. Danielly was the brick mason and brothers John and Hezekiah Bond did the carpentry. The congregation only used this church until 1827, when they again built a new church in Appling proper, likely to accommodate a growing membership. It served until it was destroyed by a tornado in 1875 with the congregation meeting in the courthouse until another church was built. A modern facility in Appling serves the church today, while the historic church is used for special events.

Daniel Marshall was a native of Connecticut and established Baptist churches in Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina and served as a missionary to the Native Americans. The Marshall family preached the gospel at Kiokee for sixty years. After Daniel’s service (1772-84), his son Abraham (1784-1819) succeeded him, followed by his grandson Jabez (1819-1832).

*-The first Baptist church established in Georgia was the Tuckaseeking Baptist Church in Effingham County. They were a Seventh Day Baptist congregation and were active from 1759 until about 1763, when persecution forced them out of Georgia. Never a common sect in Georgia, the Seventh Day Baptists claim just one congregation and one mission in the state today.

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --COLUMBIA COUNTY GA--, Appling GA

Lamar-Blanchard House, 1823, Lincolnton

Peter Lamar (1789-1847), the first owner of this house, was one of the pioneer settlers of Lincolnton. He served as a State Representative for the terms of 1811 and 1812 and was the commissioner of Lincolnton when it was established in 1817. From 1816-1834 he was Clerk of the Superior Court of Lincoln County and was a State Senator from 1834-1838. He also served as a justice of the Inferior Court from 1837-1844, and as a captain of the local militia.

National Register of Historic Places

1 Comment

Filed under --LINCOLN COUNTY GA--, Lincolnton GA

Chennault House, 1850s, Lincoln County

Tax records indicate that Abraham D. Chennault likely had this house built circa 1857-58; land in the vicinity had been occupied by his family since the 1820s. It is thought to be the work of John Cunningham, a local carpenter linked to three other prominent houses in the immediate area. When his mother died (mid-1860s) Abraham left Lincoln County and transferred the lands and house to his brother John N. Chennault. It remained within the family well into the 20th century.

The house has always been linked to an infamous ending chapter of the Civil War. As the Confederate cabinet and other high officials were fleeing Richmond, they carried with them the bulk of the Confederate treasury. Almost all of the assets were dispersed to pay soldiers, before the capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinville on 10 May 1865. Remaining funds were left in Washington, Georgia.

The New Georgia Encyclopedia notes: A detachment of Union soldiers set out to divert this specie to a railhead in South Carolina. The wagons stopped for the night at the Chennault Plantation and it was here that on 24 May 24 1865, bandits attacked the wagons and $251,029 was lost. Bank officials eventually recovered some $111,000 of the stolen money. Union General Edward A. Wild led a search of the area for more gold and earned notoriety for the arrest and torture of the Chennault family, who Wild believed were hiding gold but who turned out to be innocent. As a consequence, Union General Ulysses S. Grant removed Wild from his command.

In the century-and-a-half since the end of the Civil War, historians and fortune-seekers alike have sought the lost Confederate gold. Where it is or whether it even remains will always be Georgia legend.

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --LINCOLN COUNTY GA--, Chennault GA

Holt-Peeler-Snow House, 1840, Macon

Built for Judge Thaddeus Goode Holt by Elam Alexander, this is one of the finest Greek Revival houses in Macon. Judge Holt was one of the most prominent citizens of early Macon, accompanying the Marquis de LaFayette on his 1825 visit at the behest of the governor. In addition to serving as Judge of the County Court, he also served on the city council and was involved in numerous business pursuits. Judge Holt’s son, Thaddeus, Jr., served in several Confederate military units and was also Judge of the County Court. His granddaughter, Nanaline Holt, first married Will Inman, of the prominent Atlanta family, and later married the tobacco magnate James Buchanan Duke. They were the parents of Doris Duke. Numerous owners followed, including: Joseph Dannenberg; E. L. Martin; Leon I. Dure; Amp Peeler; and William A. Snow, Jr.

It appears to be in a state of decline at this time.

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Raines-Miller-Carmichael House, Circa 1848, Macon

Designed by Elam Alexander for Judge Cadwallader Raines in the shape of a modified Greek cross with rooms branching out in four directions from a central octagonal hall, this is one of Macon’s finest homes. A spectacular spiral staircase originates in the foyer and leads to the octagonal cupola. The porches originally ran alongside the rooms, conforming to the shape of the house, but were later changed to their current circular fashion.

Judge Raines died in 1856 and his wife in 1860, leaving no heirs. The house was sold to Central Bank of Georgia president John E. Jones in 1869 and later came into the possession of Dr. George T. Miller before being purchased by Robert Joseph Carmichael.

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Beall-Jordan-Dunlap House, 1860, Macon

When built for plantation owner Nathan Beall, this house was a large but simple Victorian. He later sold it Leonadius H. Jordan, owner of the Academy of Music (today’s Grand Opera House). Jordan died in 1899 and in 1900 it was restored by Confederate Captain Samuel S. Dunlap, the most significant change being the addition of 18 Corinthian columns. During World War II, it was a boarding house and tea room operated by Mrs. Robert Lasseter. A photo of The Allman Brothers standing on the front porch of the house, looking a bit worse for wear, graces the cover of their eponymous debut album in 1969. In the 1970s and 1980s it was one of Macon’s most popular restaurants, known as Beall’s 1860. In 2001 it was restored by Gus Bell and donated to Mercer University in 2008. Today, it’s home to Mercer University’s Robert McDuffie Center for Strings.

Macon Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA