Tag Archives: Antebellum North Georgia

Moore-Pate House, Circa 1820, Taliaferro County

This amazing house is critically endangered. Several outbuildings survive on the property. I hope to update its history in the future. Thanks to James Woodall for confirming the identification.

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Georgian Cottage, Taliaferro County

Discussions with locals suggest this home is likely antebellum.

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Georgian Cottage, Sharon

This house is decidedly different in style from the Georgian Cottage in the previous post, but follows the same general floor plan of four rooms divided by a central hallway. This is a wonderful antebellum example.

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Filed under --TALIAFERRO COUNTY GA--, Sharon GA

James & Cunningham Daniel House, 1810s, Wilkes County

One of the great landmarks of Federal architecture in Georgia, this highly stylized brick I-house may be unique in the state. This house type is much more common in Virginia and, to a lesser extent, North Carolina but this is the only one I’ve encountered in my travels in rural Georgia. The dedication of family members and later guardians to preserve the house has been central to its continued survival.

James Allen Daniel, Jr., (1740-1821) was born in Prince Edward County, Virginia. With brothers John, William, and David, James migrated through the Carolinas and served as a dragoon in the American Revolution during this time. James was one of three Daniel brothers who married three Cunningham sisters of Amelia County, Virginia [James married Elizabeth Cunningham (1749-1819) in 1767]. In 1791 he was among the early settlers of Wilkes County and one of the fathers of the Presbyterian church in the eastern Piedmont region. Family records indicate that James built the home for his son Cunningham (1768-1839) but may have occupied the property until his death. From Cunningham the home passed to his son James Ewing Daniel; from James Ewing Daniel to his daughter Frances Daniel Dillard; and finally to Frances Dillard’s son, Roy Dillard, who was the last Daniel descendant to occupy the house (1954). The house was unoccupied until 1967 when Roy Dillard’s heirs sold it to the David and Diana Blackburn, who subsequently named it “Kettle Creek Manor” for the three branches of Kettle Creek which run through the property and the nearby Revolutionary War battle site of the same name.

National Register of Historic Places

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The Cedars, 1793, 1803 & 1883, Washington

The appearance of this landmark, one of the most iconic houses in Washington, has been altered considerably since the original section was completed by Anthony Poullain circa 1793. It was purchased in 1803 by Savannah merchant John Bolton, who significantly enlarged it for use as a summer retreat. Robert Sims added the Victorian details responsible for its present appearance in 1883. It is currently for sale and was recently listed by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation as a Place in Peril.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WILKES COUNTY GA--, Washington GA

Colley-Barksdale-Thomas House, Circa 1838, Washington

Built by Francis Colley for his son, Henry F. Colley and his wife Isabella Harris Colley, this home stayed in the same family until 2005. Captain Henry F. Colley was killed in action in the Civil War in 1862.

East Robert Toombs Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Tarver-Webster-Wickersham House, Circa 1820, Wasington

Also known as the Tarver-Maynard House, this has most recently served as a bed and breakfast inn. It was once a dormitory for a Female Seminary and housed some of the students at Washington Academy, including future Confederate vice president and Georgia governor Alexander Hamilton Stephens.

East Robert Toombs Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WILKES COUNTY GA--, Washington GA