Tag Archives: Antebellum North Georgia

Gloaming Cottage, 1840, Clarkesville

Jarvis Mudge Pieterse Van Buren (1801-1885), first cousin of President Martin Van Buren, came to Clarkesville from Kinderhook, New York, around 1840 to manage the Stroop Iron Works and help develop Georgia’s earliest railroads. He had been involved in the assembly and operation of the first successful American steam locomotive in New York. Not long after coming to Clarkesville, Jarvis quickly turned his attention to architecture, furniture making, and horticulture, and was responsible for the construction of numerous homes and public buildings in the area. He built this house as his residence when he came to Clarkesville.

 

 

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Filed under --HABERSHAM COUNTY GA--, Clarkesville GA

First Presbyterian Church, 1848, Clarkesville

Reverend William Quillian organized the First Presbyterian Church of Clarkesville in 1832, with seven charter members. They met in the Methodist church in their early years. The present structure was built in 1848 by Jarvis Van Buren, first cousin of President Martin Van Buren. The dedication sermon was delivered by the Reverend Nathan Hoyt, grandfather of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson. Members of the congregation included two Attorneys General, John McPherson Berrien and Amos T. Akerman. In 1907, when part of the church lot was sold to W. R. Asbury, the building was turned around from its location facing Jefferson Street to its present location.

Washington-Jefferson Street Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under --HABERSHAM COUNTY GA--, Clarkesville GA

Ayers-Little Boarding House, Circa 1840 & 1885, Carnesville

The first part of this house was built circa 1840 as a residence and tavern and in 1860 was purchased by Jeremiah Ayers. He joined the original part of the house and  an adjacent post office with a breezeway. Ayers was a merchant and tanner and upon his death in 1885 his widow Louisa and their daughter Lizzie began taking in boarders to help support themselves. They lived in the basement and rented the upper rooms. Lizzie married Robert Little in 1901. They raised their children here and continued to take in boarders. Around 1930 they renovated and slightly expanded the boarding house and opened a coffee shop in the dining room. After Mr. Little’s death in 1943, Lizzie continued operating the business. In 1949, she became editor of the Carnesville Herald. She died in 1963.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --FRANKLIN COUNTY GA--, Carnesville GA

Carroll’s Methodist Church, Circa 1835, Franklin County

William Carroll established this congregation in 1797. The present structure was built around 1835 and remodeled in 1952. Bishop Francis Asbury preached at the location on 21 November 1799. The entry from his diary reads: We drove 16 miles to Carroll’s Meeting House, a new log cabin in the woods. Some of the people of the congregation are from the east and west parts of Maryland. I felt the Lord was with them. We have the kitchen, house, and chamber all in one and no closet but the woods…

An early cemetery adjoins the property and many unknown graves are marked with crosses.

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Filed under --FRANKLIN COUNTY GA--

Thomas Long House, Circa 1854, Paoli

This was the home of Thomas Wilson Long (15 September 1784-21 July 1861), who came to Georgia from Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was the uncle of medical pioneer Crawford W. Long and is buried nearby in the New Hope Presbyterian Church Cemetery. I will update information on subsequent owners as I learn more. The 1854 date is probably incorrect; some have suggested 1830s is more likely.

The house is surrounded by pristine farmland on one of the most beautiful backroads in the area.

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Filed under --MADISON COUNTY GA--, Paoli GA

Antebellum House, Warrenton

I’ve contacted Warrenton’s Main Street office for assistance in identifying some of its historic houses with no luck so far, but I would be comfortable saying this house is antebellum, and quite early. It’s of a transitional type I’ve encountered in some of Georgia’s oldest counties.  The Victorian porch posts are obviously a later addition.

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Filed under --WARREN COUNTY GA--, Warrenton GA

Pottle-West House, Circa 1810, Warrenton

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Warrenton, you’ve undoubtedly noticed this magnificent house. Information about its history is scarce, but the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation noted: …Originally designed in the Federal style, the house had an asymmetric front facade and side hall floor plan. Mid-19th century additions created the more symmetric Greek Revival appearance of the house that was later altered again with the addition of the decorative folk Victorian front porch…

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Filed under --WARREN COUNTY GA--, Warrenton GA