Tag Archives: African-Americans in North Georgia

H & H Restaurant, Macon

Inez Hill and Louise Hudson, affectionately known as Mama Hill and Mama Louise, opened their H & H Restaurant on the corner of Hayes and Third Street in 1959, moving to Cotton Avenue for a time before finally settling at the present Forsyth Avenue location. The establishment soon became a Macon favorite and would go on to acquire iconic status for its association with the Allman Brothers Band. In their struggling early days, the band members came into H &  H and were so broke they had to share plates. Mama Louise, sensing they were hungry, made them all their own plates, free of charge. The musicians never forgot her act of kindness and promised to make it up to her when they made it big. In 1972, they took her on tour.

For serious fans of the Allman Brothers Band, no trip to Macon would be complete without a visit to H & H. It was the hospitality of Mama Louise that helped put the place on the map and nearly fifty years later people still make their way here to feel a connection to rock history. The memorabilia-lined walls never fail to amaze. The Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie, and countless others were H & H regulars in Macon’s musical heyday of the early 1970s. It was also an important meeting place for Macon’s civil rights leaders and activists.

Of course, people come for the history and legend but return for the excellent food. Known as Macon’s “fried chicken specialist”, H & H also offers items like country fried steak, fried fish, oxtails, and more. The meats are great, but the sides are even better. I’m not a fan of collards, but I like H & H’s. Their mashed potatoes are creamy (not runny) and the squash casserole is as good as you’ll find anywhere. They top it with cheese to make it perfect.

Mama Hill collapsed while working in the restaurant in 2007 and died the next day at the age of 92. H & H briefly closed in 2013 but reopened in early 2015. It’s been called Georgia’s most iconic restaurant and while it fits the bill, it’s not a pretentious place. You’ll feel right at home when you walk in the door, with locals and tourists alike. The staff are some of the best you’ll find anywhere and the food will not disappoint.

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Filed under --BIBB COUNTY GA--, Macon GA

Uncle Remus Museum, 1963, Eatonton

Constructed from derelict slave cabins, the Uncle Remus Museum opened in Eatonton in 1963. Its location, Turner Park, was the boyhood homeplace of Joseph Sidney Turner, the inspiration for the “little boy” to whom “Uncle Remus” relayed all his critter stories in Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings (1880) and later works. Turner’s father, Joseph Addison Turner, owned Turnwold Plantation where Harris apprenticed as a teenager during the Civil War. A reconstructed blacksmith shop is also located in the park.

Carvings of many of the animal characters populate the grounds, which are a delight to walk around. I’m not sure who did all of these wonderful wood sculptures, but they’re a wonderful addition to the property. And forgive me if I confuse Bre’r Fox and Bre’r Wolf!

Bre’r Fox

Bre’r Wolf

Bre’r Bear

Bre’r Tarrypin

And last, but certainly not least, Bre’r Rabbit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under --PUTNAM COUNTY GA--, Eatonton GA

New Hope Baptist Church, Flovilla

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Filed under --BUTTS COUNTY GA--, Flovilla GA

Fountain Grove Baptist Church, Columbia County

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Filed under --COLUMBIA COUNTY GA--

World War I Memorial, 1922, Hartwell

In Memoriam of the Hart County Soldiers who died in the World War, 1917-19.

These lost their lives: John W. Adams; James B. Estes; Owen J. Alford; John R. Heaton; George W. Cason; Oscar B. McCurley; Preston B. Carter; Lawrence Nix; Samuel J. Chapellear; Gilbert Thompson; William J. Connelley; Vancey J. Wilson; Charles P. Dodd. Colored: Erskin Allen; Anderson Harris; Henry Gaines.

This row of oaks planted and the bronze tablet erected by the Hartwell Federated Woman’s Club.Hartwell GA., June 1922.

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Filed under --HART COUNTY GA--, Hartwell GA

Gordon-Lee Mansion, 1847, Chickamauga

James Gordon and his two brothers came to Chickamauga, then known as Crawfish Springs, from Gwinnett County in 1836.  In 1840, James began construction of this home (employing slave labor and using bricks made on site) to serve as the centerpiece of his 2500-acre plantation. The site was of local importance, as the Cherokee Courthouse was located on the grounds prior to displacement. [It was originally executed in the Greek Revival style; the addition of the massive portico and entablature in a 1900 remodel gave it its present Neoclassical appearance].

Gordon’s son Clark was elected commanding officer of Company D, First Georgia Volunteer Infantry, organized in 1862. During the Battle of Chickamauga the home served as temporary headquarters of Union Major General William Rosecrans, Army of the Cumberland (16-19 September 1863). It also served as a field hospital (18-20 September 1863) under the command of Medical Surgeon R. G. Bogue, treating both Union and Confederate casualties. In 1889, 14,000 veterans of the battle held a reunion on the grounds known as the Blue-Gray Barbeque. The idea to establish the Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park had its origins at the barbeque, significantly the first Civil War park in the United States to be protected through preservation.

Upon the death of James and Sarah Gordon, the home passed to their daughter, Elizabeth, and her husband, James Lee. The next owner was their son, Gordon Lee, a United States Congressman (1904-1927), and his wife, Olive. Lee stipulated in his will that if no family member took on the property for twenty years that it would become the property of the City of Chickamauga and this happened in 1947.  It was sold to Dr. Frank Green in 1974. Dr. Green restored the house and grounds with great attention to historical accuracy. In 2007 it was purchased by the City of Chickamauga, which now operates a museum on the site.

This saddlebag house is the last surviving of six slave dwellings on the property.

Even if you don’t have the time to visit all the Civil War sites in the area, take the time to walk the wonderful grounds of the Gordon-Lee Mansion. Operated by the Friends of the Gordon-Lee Mansion in conjunction with the City of Chickamauga, it’s a wonderful green space and historic site.

National Register of Historic Places

 

 

 

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Filed under --WALKER COUNTY GA--, Chickamauga GA

Prince Hall Lodge No. 221, 1924, Chickamauga

From the historical marker placed in 2010 by the Walker County African-American Historical & Alumni Association: Chickamauga Prince Hall Lodge No. 221 Free & Accepted Masons of Georgia; First Charter 1915; Second Charter June 11, 1926. Present building completed in 1924, rededication 1952. Organized by once enslaved and and first generation freed African Americans. During segregation, in Walker County’s African American communities, Masons are active in the building & support of schools, churches, needy children & widows, laying cornerstones, funeral rites, burial insurance & social events. 1915 Charter: Rev. Kendall, Worshipful Master; C. D. Haslerig, Sr. Warden; C. S. Shellman, Jr. Warden; Archie Haslerig, Sec.; Sam Dodson, Treas.; John Daniel, Tyler. Worshipful Masters: C. D. Haslerig, C. W. Haslerig, W. A. Haslerig, Joseph McGinitis, Louis Moss, Raymond Smith, Bill Madden, Ray Hinton, Moses Cleveland, Lafayette Daniel, Joseph T. Suttle, Sam Mitchell, David Myers & Eddie W. Foster, Sr.

Chickamauga Ester Chapter 476 Order of Eastern Star. Charter granted June 28, 1944: Odessa Haslerig, Worthy Matron; Raymond Smith, Worthy Patron; Rugh Jones, Associate Matron; Sally Shropshire, Secretary.

The Walker County African-American VFW held its charter meeting here in the 1940s and the lodge was home to the organization for a time.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under --WALKER COUNTY GA--