Category Archives: –MORGAN COUNTY GA–

Nolan Plantation I-House, Circa 1817, Bostwick

This circa 1817 I-house was part of a much larger plantation purchased by the Nolan family in the 1850s. It was home to the Nolan family before the more substantial structure was built at the crossroads circa 1905. It is not publicly accessible but visible from the right of way in winter.

National Register of Historic Places

 

 

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Nolan Plantation Smokehouse, Bostwick

Since this has no windows, I’ve ruled out identifying it as a tenant house; a tool house or corn crib wouldn’t have a chimney. Therefore, I’m presuming it’s a smokehouse.

National Register of Historic Places

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Dovecote House, Circa 1830, Madison

This home was built in the transitional Federal style by Isaac Walker for his daughter Cornelia and her husband Thomas Jefferson Burney circa 1830 and remodeled to its present Victorian appearance by Martin Richter circa 1895. The house supposedly survived a devastating fire in Madison in 1869 by being covered with wet blankets. It derives its name from a dovecote in the yard.

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Foster-Thomason-Miller House, 1883, Madison

This stunning relic of the Aesthetic Movement has long been a favorite of photographers and visitors to Madison. After years of neglect and an uncertain future, this endangered property has a new owner and a bright future, with restoration in its future.

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Jessup-Atkinson House, Circa 1820, Madison

This house was built circa 1820 and and has been remodeled and expanded over the years. It’s sometimes referred to as “Luhurst” for former owner Lula Hurst Atkinson. As a teenager in the 1880s, Lula Hurst traveled around the country performing illusions of strength and levitation under the name “Lulu Hurst, The Georgia Wonder”. After working only two years she gave up performing and married her manager, Paul Atkinson, who once owned the Atlanta Cyclorama. They moved to Madison and Lula lived in this house until her death in 1949.

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Bell-Arnold House, Circa 1840, Madison

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Knight House, Circa 1848, Madison

Also known as the Knight-Jarvis-Senft House, for some of the 11 owners who have called it home, this Madison landmark was built by Dr. Gazaway B. Knight, who commanded the locally organized Panola Guards during the Civil War. Dr. Knight’s wife, Isabell, was the daughter of U. S. Senator Joshua Hill. After a fire in 1915, the house, originally a 2-story Colonial, was redesigned to its present appearance. Many original features survived the fire and the house is an outstanding example of the blending of historical and modern amenities.

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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John Hudson Hunter House, 1883, Madison

Known as the “Gingerbread House” for the elaborate spindle-work on its porch, this eclectic Madison favorite was built by John Hudson Hunter.

Madison Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Historic Storefronts, Godfrey

godfrey ga storefronts photograph copyright brian brown vanishing north georgia usa 2016

A marker placed by Morgan County in celebration of their bicentennial in 2007 reads: The town of Godfrey was incorporated by the Georgia Legislature on July 25, 1906. However, this community has much older roots. Local lore places the earliest geographical reference to a community in this area called Hamburg. By the early 1800s the community was known as Antioch for the original Antioch church built there around 1809. By 1839 the area was known as Evansville, perhaps for a local academy that existed there. One of the earliest industries in the area was a grist mill known as Walton’s Mill, operated by the Walton Family. Fire destroyed it around 1950. Mary Perkins Walton, a descendant of the Walton Family, married Dr. James Ervine Godfrey, a former Confederate surgeon. Dr. and Mrs. Godfrey acquired land in this area through her family and owned a plantation called Egypt. For a time, this community was identified with this plantation, and was called Egypt. The community was later named after Dr. Godfrey when the post office opened in the late 1800s. By 1867 two Baptist churches and one Methodist church had been established. The first school was established in the early 1900s. At its peak the town included eight stores, a bank, barber shop, livery stable, icehouse, cotton gin, warehouse, peach shed, railroad depot, post office, and Walton’s Mill. Godfrey depended on the Central of Georgia Railroad for passenger service, mail service and transportation of commodities.

godfrey ga commercial corner photograph copyright brian brown vanishing north georgia usa 2016

There are several old storefronts in Godfrey.

godfrey ga historic architecture photograph copyright brian brown vanishing north georgia usa 2016

The large building below may have been a combination store/warehouse.

godfrey ga general store warehouse photograph copyright brian brown vanishing north georgia usa 2016

 

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Godfrey United Methodist Church, 1893, Morgan County

historic godfrey united methodist church morgan county ga photograph copyright brian brown vanishing north georgia usa 2016

Though it has been remodeled several times over the years, this is the original church built in 1893.

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Filed under --MORGAN COUNTY GA--, Godfrey GA