Category Archives: Milledgeville GA

Orme-Sallee House, Circa 1822, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Landmark Antebellum House Williams Orme Salle Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Attributed to Daniel Pratt, this iconic home is perhaps the best example of the Milledgeville Federal Style. Though built by John Williams, it has come to be known as the Orme-Sallee House. Richard McAlister Orme was a land and slave owner and editor of Milledgeville’s Southern Recorder. Though initially opposed to secession, Orme became an ardent supporter upon his sons’ entrance into the war. During the Sherman’s March to the Sea, Mrs. Orme, who was from Massachusetts, hid her Confederate son-in-law in the attic of this house during its occupation by Union forces.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Williams Orme Sallee House Antebellum Double Chimneys Fanlight Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Double chimneys on both sides of the house and attic fanlight are nice features. The south side fanlight, seen below, has been lost to a modern replacement.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Landmark Milledgeville Federal House Williams Orme Salle Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

The front door, with ornamental fanlight and sidelights, is my favorite feature.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Williams Orme Sallee House Front Door Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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The Homestead, 1818, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County The Homestead Landmark Antebellum House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Built for Peter J. Williams, the Homestead was owned for many generations by his descendants, including his great-granddaughters “Miss Sue” Jones, Mrs. David Ferguson, and Betty Ferguson. Frances Lewis is also listed by architectural historian John Linley as an owner of this grand home.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County The Homestead Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

In The Architecture of Middle Georgia: The Oconee Area, John Linley shares some fascinating anecdotes about the Homestead: It…has a ghost, who appears as a little old lady dressed in brown and usually seen in the garden about dusk. She…has followed the family from Wales to New England, and thence to Georgia. She also attends to her ghostly duties, though in a rather lackadaisical way. She has been known to appear to members of the family just before they died, or before there were deaths in the family. Mostly, however, she just putters about the garden.

But please don’t come here looking for the ghost or for an invitation into the garden. Be respectful that the house is private property.

More importantly, Linley continues: The Homestead may well be the first house in America to utilize a narrow colossal-type portico with only two columns. Though never widely used, the style became so popular in the Milledgeville area that it is frequently referred to as the Milledgeville-Federal type of architecture.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County The Homestead Kitchen Cook House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Adjacent to the Homestead is this structure, the brick lower floor of which was originally the kitchen for the estate. It’s likely contemporary to the 1818 date of the main house. The second floor was a later addition which I assume may have housed servants.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County The Homestead Cook House Kitchen Later Remodeled for Use as a House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Place

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Bearden-Montgomery House, 1899, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Bearden Montgomery House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Kenan-Bell House, Circa 1820, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Kenan Bell Humbert Scarboro House Antebellum Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

The Humbert and Scarboro families were later owners of this house.

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Dr. Charles Paine House, 1820, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Historic Antebellum Landmark House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Originally attributed to Daniel Pratt, recent scholarship suggests it was likely the work of John Marlor. It features a rear wing not original to the structure but tastefully integrated. Other owners have been the Rockwell and Jones families.

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Bell-Martin-Kidd House, 1898, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Martin Kidd House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Methodist Monument, Memory Hill, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Memory Hill Cemetery Methodist Monument Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

This marks the original site of the Methodist Church erected about the year 1805. Bishop Asbury and Bishop McKendree in 1815 held here a conference which James O. Andrew attended. Bishop Capers, Dr. Lovick Pierce, and many other notable figures of Methodism served as pastors. The daughter of Bishop Capers is buried near this spot. In gracious appreciation of the pioneer work done by this great church this boulder is erected by the Robert E. Lee Chapter UDC, 1929.

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Memory Hill Cemetery Jordan Family Plot Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Opened for burials in 1804, Memory Hill is among the most historic cemeteries in Georgia, though not quite as extensive as Savannah’s Bonaventure, Macon’s Rose Hill, or Atlanta’s Oakland. Some of the more famous “residents” here include architect John Marlor, Flannery O’Connor, magician/vaudevillian star Dixie Haygood (known as Annie Abbott, the Georgia Magnet), Representative Carl Vinson, Bill Miner (one of the last Western outlaws), Charles Holmes Herty (UGA’s first football coach), as well as numerous slaves, Civil War veterans, politicians and inmates of the Georgia Lunatic Asylum. An extensive guide to Memory Hill can be found here.

Both images are from the Jordan Family plot, one of the most photographed in Memory Hill.

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Memory Hill Cemetery Elizabeth Taylor Grave Headstone Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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The Cedars, Circa 1822, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Antebellum Landmark Home the Cedars Sunburst Pediment Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

Now in use as a sorority house, this is one of the best exemplars of the so-called Milledgeville-Federal Style. The Cedars originally fronted Clarke Street and a cedar-lined circular drive marked its entrance, hence the name. Charles W. Howard was the first owner and Daniel Pratt is thought to have been the architect. Formal gardens at the original location were designed by Irish landscape gardener Patrick Crane. Other owners have included the Jarrett, Scott, Prosser, Moran, Tigner, Smith, and Garrard families, among others.

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Gordon-Cline-O’Connor House, Circa 1820, Milledgeville

Milledgeville GA Baldwin County Gordon Cline OConnor House Flannery O Connor Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

During my first year at Georgia College, I lived in the then-derelict Ennis Hall, directly behind this enigmatic literary landmark. Flannery’s mother, Regina Cline O’Connor, well into her nineties, still lived here then. The house was in a much worse state of repair at the time. Apparently, it was built by a General Gordon around 1820. During the mid-1830s it was rented to the State of Georgia for use as a temporary Governor’s Mansion, and was later owned by Flannery O’Connor’s matriarchal ancestors, the Clines. At some point in its early history it was the victim of a fire, though I’m unsure about the chronology.

In his seminal work Architecture of Middle Georgia: The Oconee Area, John Linley states: “The house is not one that can be judged architecturally. No doubt it was finer and more stately before the fire and subsequent changes…”

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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