William Baldwin House, 1818, Lexington

Lexington GA Oglethorpe County Dr Bernard Chedel House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

Like many of Lexington’s historic homes, this Greek Revival landmark was built as an I-House (Plantation Plain) by William Baldwin and evolved with the needs of its subsequent owners. The columns and portico were added just before the Civil War, by Swepson Cox; the hip roof is thought to have been added at that time, as well. Dr. Bernard Chedell was a longtime resident, as was the Hugh Callaway family. [Variant names include the Cox-Chedell-Johnston House & the Chedell-Broach-Titus House].The Johnston, Broach and Titus families have also called this beautiful house home over the years. Linda Titus Parish, the present owner, has done a great job of maintaining the historical integrity of the property.

Lexington GA Oglethorpe County Dr Bernard Chedel House Perspective Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2015

L. D. Andrew photographed the home and a dovecote on the property in May 1936, for the Historic American Buildings Survey. I assumed it was gone, but owner Linda Titus Parrish notes: “When we purchased the property in 1976, the original dovecote/carriage house had been turned into a one car garage with storage and a manger added behind it. It still exists, without the dovecote, and is now used as storage and a workshop area with a new tin roof“.  Photographs Courtesy Library of Congress.

Lexington GA Cox Chedel Johnston House Photographed by L. D. Andrew Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy Library of Congress

Lexington GA Dovecote at Cox Chedel Johnston House Photographed by L D Andrew HABS Courtesy of Library of Congress

Lexington Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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2 Comments

Filed under --OGLETHORPE COUNTY GA--, Lexington GA

2 responses to “William Baldwin House, 1818, Lexington

  1. Linda Titus Parish

    Dr. Chedell was never an owner of the property but rented it while it was in a trust, as did the Hugh Callaways. When we purchased the property in 1976, the original dovecote/carriage house had been turned into a one car garage with storage and a manger added behind it. It still exists, without the dovecote, and is now used as storage and a workshop area with a new tin roof. I (Linda Parish) hope to eventually replicate the small garden house to the right of the main house. The kitchen house, on the right property line, was destroyed in the late 50’s or early 60’s and a large tree fell on the barn and demolished it a few years ago. There was apparently a smaller barn behind and to the left of the house that was torn down, probably in the 1960’s or early 1970’s. We purchased the house in 1976 and there was no sign of it until I discovered large rocks buried in the area – probably from the foundation. In 2014, I built a potting shed/ storage barn with all materials from the 1800’s to the right rear of the main house.

    • Thanks, Linda. It’s so hard to give these houses a “name” sometimes! I wonder why he went to the expense of putting his name on the steps near the sidewalk if he rented. Probably just so people would know where he was since he was a doctor, perhaps. It’s a beautiful home and glad to hear you’re doing things to retain its historic character. It looks great!

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