Elberton Air Line Railroad Depot, 1877, Martin

Martin GA Southern Railway Depot Stephens County Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing North Georgia USA 2014

The Elberton Air Line was opened in December 1878 with the assistance of the Atlanta & Charlotte Air-Line Railway. This soon merged with the Southern Railway and this depot served the line until the middle of the 20th century. According to the National Register nomination form, the depot was constructed in 1877.

Martin Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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2 Comments

Filed under --STEPHENS COUNTY GA--, Martin GA

2 responses to “Elberton Air Line Railroad Depot, 1877, Martin

  1. Ben Dooley

    Brian, as a kid growing up in Gainesville our next door neighbor was an older gentleman who had retired from a management position with the Gainesville Midland RR. He was something of a railroad buff and loved to tell tales. I remember him telling that when the railroad first came to Gainesville in the 1870’s it was known as the Southern Air Line Railroad usually referred to as the Air Line, but that it later became the Southern Railway. He even pointed out that it was specifically “Railway” not “Railroad” in imitation of the Southern Railway in England. In those days the Southern even used the same color scheme on its locomotives as the English counterpart. He surmised one reason for the name change was to avoid confusion with the Seaboard Air Line which ran through Athens. I have no idea whether his version of history is true, but he was a wonderful old gentleman who, with his wife, finally left Gainesville in the 50’s and lived out his long life near his son’s family in Deland, FL.

    • Ben Dooley

      I just did a little research at the horse’s mouth…the website site of the Southern Railway History Assoc…The Atlanta and Richmond Airline was completed through NE GA (Toccoa, Cornelia, Gainesville, Buford) in 1873 and was one of the routes which became part of the Southern Railway when it came into existence in 1894 with the merging of several earlier lines. History is always fascinating.

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