DeLauney-Scott-Joseph-Malpass-Simmerson-Hobbs House, Circa 1825, Milledgeville

Thanks to the good folks at the Milledgville-Baldwin County Convention & Visitors Bureau for finally filling in some of the blanks on this house. They note that it originally faced Jefferson Street. Though it isn’t quite as “refined” as other examples of the Milledgeville-Federal Style houses for which the city is known, likely due to alterations after it was moved, it definitely falls into that category.

Milledgeville Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under --BALDWIN COUNTY GA--, Milledgeville GA

General Store, Circa 1925, Milledgeville

I’ve so far been unable to track down any history on this old store, dated in a resource survey to circa 1925. I will update when I learn more.

Leave a comment

Filed under --BALDWIN COUNTY GA--, Milledgeville GA

Rock Hawk Effigy, Putnam County

From the Rock Hawk website: It is not known who built the Rock Eagle or Rock Hawk Effigies, nor exactly when or why. The effigies were located on land occupied by Native Americans before early settlers took ownership via treaties and land grants shortly after 1800.

In 1805 Robert White acquired the property where the Rock Hawk Effigy is located through a land lottery but sold it in 1818 to Kinchen Little, who would become one of Putnam County’s most prominent citizens. (Rock Hawk was often known as the “Sparta Road Eagle” or “Little Eagle,” which generally referred to the Little family, but many interpreted this to mean an eagle smaller than Rock Eagle.)

The Rock Eagle Effigy is located at the University of Georgia 4-H Center on US Highway 441 in Putnam County. Dr. A.R. Kelly of the University of Georgia, after at least a couple of years of interest in the local mounds, became involved with the WPA (Works Progress Administration) in 1936 to conduct numerous excavations and surveys at Rock Eagle. They recovered small amounts of aboriginal pottery, chipped stone, and daub, which were not considered significant and suggested to many archaeologists and others that the В“cleanВ” mound was used for religious purposes. During that time, the effigy was reconstructed to the 1877 measurements of C.C. Jones. By 1938 the fence, walkway, and tower were added to finish off the preservation of the mound, as it appears today.

At the time that Dr. A. R. Kelly of the University of Georgia and the WPA (Works Progress Administration) were excavating at the Rock Eagle Effigy, a letter dated March 23, 1936 was sent from George A. Turner of the Rural Resettlement Administration to Richard W. Smith, Secretary Treasurer of the Society of Georgia Archaeology concerning a third bird effigy. The letter referred to a map of Putnam County prepared by Turner, which showed the locations of important archaeological sites. In addition to Rock Eagle (“Scott Eagle Mound”) and Rock Hawk (“Sparta Road Eagle”) he identified the following mound, which became known as the Pressley (Presley) Mound: “No.3, Northwest of Eatonton on the Eatonton-Godfrey road is known as the old Pressley place. There is, at this time a large pile of rock, and someone stated that this pile of rock was once in the same shape of the Scott Eagle Mound but was destroyed by moving part of the rock. Indian relics have been found near this location.

Leave a comment

Filed under --PUTNAM COUNTY GA--

Red Elephant, Gainesville

This is well-known around Gainesville as a rental sign. Gainesville High School’s sports teams are known as the Red Elephants, a moniker they’ve had since the 1920s. They are the only high school in the country with this mascot.

3 Comments

Filed under --HALL COUNTY GA--, Gainesville GA

Grocery Store, Banks County

Leave a comment

Filed under --BANKS COUNTY GA--

Grocery Store, Juno

1 Comment

Filed under --DAWSON COUNTY GA--, Juno GA

Ridgeway Baptist Church, Circa 1865, Gilmer County

Ridgeway Baptist is one of the most historic congregations in Gilmer County and the original log church building, dating to around the end of the Civil War, is perhaps the most unique survivor in Gilmer County. Thanks to Sonny Seals of Historic Rural Churches of Georgia for bringing this special place to my attention.

Church members  have worked hard to preserve this little log chapel and their effort speaks volumes to their commitment to history. Though the structure is showing its age, I like to think it will be around for many years to come.

A new church, built in 1982, is located across the road from the old chapel.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under --GILMER COUNTY GA--