Talmadge Cooper House, 1866, Morgan County

The only information I can locate on this property identifies it as the Talmadge Cooper place. The house was built in 1866 and the Queen Anne/Second Empire details added circa 1870.

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Gabled-Ell Farmhouse, Morgan County

This simple Folk Victorian farmhouse represents one of the most common forms of late-19th and early-20th century architecture in Georgia.

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Georgian Cottage, Morgan County

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Robin’s Nest, 1830s, Morgan County

This Greek Revival landmark is also known as The Oaks Plantation and the Bennett-McIntire House, for previous owners. It is a beautifully maintained property. Morgan County notes that the earliest deed extant for the house dates to 1840, but it likely predates that by a few years. It was on the old stage road between Charleston and New Orleans.

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General Putnam Restaurant, Eatonton

Since a fire destroyed the General Putnam Motel in 2018, the restaurant is all that remains, and it probably won’t be around much longer. This was a popular location for tourists on US 441 in the pre-interstate days and beyond, but is best known as one of the set locations for the movie My Cousin Vinny. It’s just north of Eatonton, but I believe a recent expansion of the municipal boundary places it within the city limits today. It likely dates to the late 1940s or early 1950s.

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Gorley House, 1850s, Putnam County

This iconic Putnam County home, built circa 1856, was recently restored. It remains in the family and the owners have done a wonderful job. Thanks to Anna O’Neal for the identification.

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Board-and-Batten Shed, Hancock County

This is located near Old St. Galilee Church.

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St. Paul CME Church, 1890s, Hancock County

According to Harrell Lawson, St. Paul CME traces its origins to a group of enslaved men and women from David Dickson’s nearby plantation who began holding informal services in a brush arbor in 1857. In 1870, the members purchased land on which today’s church stands in order to have a permanent meeting place but due to confusion over two different deeds (1870, 1877), Lawson doesn’t note exactly when the first church was built. Since the CME church was not founded as a national entity until 1870, it is thought that that association came later. Resource surveys date the present structure to 1890, though I have been unable to confirm the date.

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St. Paul Meetinghouse, 1870s, Hancock County

Harrell Lawson’s History of St. Pau CME Church [2005] describes the two-story meetinghouse adjacent to the church as a building previously used as a school for the secular education of the youth of the community and as a meeting place for Masons and a burial society founded by St. Paul members in the early 1900’s.

A resource survey conducted in 2001 dates the structure to circa 1870. It was built in the school/lodge combination common among African-American congregations in this part of Georgia in the late 19th century. These structures inevitably served as de facto community centers, as well. No matter when they were built, they are important resources.

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Old St. Galilee Baptist Church, Hancock County

This is the original home of Saint (St.) Galilee Baptist Church, which has a newer facility in Sparta today. I’m not sure when the church was established , nor when this structure was built. It was sided with false brick siding (tar paper) before it was bricked. A very large and well-maintained cemetery is adjacent to the property.

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